Race and revolution exploring human injustices through art

The exhibit, “Race and Revolution” is currently on display in the Rich Concourse of UConn’s Stamford Campus, 1 University Place, through Nov. 11. (Anthony Santiago/The Daily Campus)

On Thursday, Oct. 13 jazz music filled the University of Connecticut Stamford Campus’s Rich Concourse as students, faculty and community members joined together to explore injustices through art.  

Racial injustice is an age-old conflict, that has had some progress, but continues to regress and is still a prominent theme in our society. The times of racial separation, such as slavery, are gone but there is still too much discrimination – against all nationalities – for the issue to be considered solved.

Members of the Stamford campus, used their downtown location as a beacon to kick start a movement of awareness they hope the university, as well as the Stamford community, not only acknowledges but acts on.

Terrence Cheng, Director of the Stamford Campus wasted no time in seizing the opportunity to apply this topic to the campus in a beneficial way.

“It is an opportunity for students to engage with these themes and works that they might not otherwise have the chance to,” said Cheng. “It is also another great opportunity for the campus to provide a resource to the city of Stamford that does not appreciate that value of art, but is also working through the challenges that the country is working through as well.

“[UConn is] most certainly helping the cause by hosting this event with these pieces of art. They are giving people who have experienced racial injustices a voice and a means to displaying what they have been through,” said UConn Stamford student Angelica Sistrunk.

Similarly, Stamford community member Rai Cockfield said hosting the event “is a very good first step. Obviously ignoring the issue would be a bad step. I think that anything you do in a positive fashion is good.”

Overall, the event was a helpful way for the Stamford campus to address an issue through messages found in art. Anyone who found the time to slow down their bustling city lifestyle and stopped in to appreciate what had been done spoke positively of the art.

Director Cheng urges everyone to “continue to engage in this dialogue…that is when it will have success to some degree, in that, this is just one piece to a process that will keep moving forward.”

The exhibit, “Race and Revolution” is currently on display in the Rich Concourse of UConn’s Stamford Campus, 1 University Place, through Nov. 11.


Anthony Santiago is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at anthony.j.santiago@uconn.edu.