Local author breaks silence on domestic abuse

“The Lonely Nest,” a new book by local author Concetta Falcone-Codding, tells the true story of her life and the abuse she witnessed her own sister and mother endure.

Falcone-Codding grew up in Bozrah, Connecticut in the 1950s. At the time, domestic abuse and how it was dealt with was nowhere similar to how it is today. Domestic abuse was largely considered a personal matter, one that did not require the involvement of police or prosecution.

Rose and Janice Falcone, Concetta’s mother and sister, suffered physical, mental and emotional abuse, as well as incest from her father. Falcone-Codding said she was not a victim of this abuse, possibly because she stood up to her father at a very young age. She believes her father saw her as an equal.

Concetta Falcone-Codding, a local author who now resides in Danielson, Conn., recently wrote a true story about her experience while growing up and being forced to witness the domestic abuse of her sister and mother. (Courtesy/Concetta Falcone-Codding)

Concetta Falcone-Codding, a local author who now resides in Danielson, Conn., recently wrote a true story about her experience while growing up and being forced to witness the domestic abuse of her sister and mother. (Courtesy/Concetta Falcone-Codding)

After the deaths of her sister and mother from causes related to the abuse, and her father from natural causes, Falcone-Codding decided to write this book to change how domestic violence and incest survivors are viewed and helped.

Falcone-Codding pointed to the Jewish population, which continually reminds others of the horrors of the Holocaust. She said that hearing someone else’s truth can have a domino effect. She even pointed to the current political climate and said that silence is not the right path.

The book is constructed from Falcone-Codding’s memory, as well as memories passed down from her other family members, documents and letters. When a story is unclear as to how Falcone-Codding knows it, she provides an afterword to the chapter to provide context and understanding.

Falcone-Codding includes minute memories that help the reader to further understand her family dynamic. The book is rich with stories about Falcone-Codding’s education at Norwich Free Academy and includes other relevant historical information about Connecticut. Beyond her personal experiences, Falcone-Codding included relevant factual information about martial abuse, elderly abuse, incest, corporal punishment, hospital/institutional malpractice and the shortcomings of public education.

The book took seven years to write, and Falcone-Codding had to work through her severe dyslexia through the process.

The author said that she does not hold resentment against her mother for staying with her husband.

“It’s about forgiveness,” Falcone-Codding said. “I think my mother was a victim of the era. I’m not my mother’s judge or my father’s judge.”

The self-published book is Falcone-Codding’s first, and while the book is incredibly long and rough around the edges, the result is admirable and brave. Above all, the book is a window into the lives of domestic abusers and survivors, and is still a very necessary testimony. Some parts read as a journal, while other parts are polished and factual.

Falcone-Codding is a graduate of the University of Connecticut Special Education Master’s Program and Six Year Program. She currently resides in Danielson, Connecticut. She is planning to write a second book, a non-fiction analysis of the public education systems that she worked in for years.

“The Lonely Nest” is available on Amazon in Kindle and print editions.


Claire Galvin is a senior staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at claire.galvin@uconn.edu.