Making liquor cheaper 'the common sense thing to do,' Malloy says

Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy speaks after being sworn in for his second term, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015, inside the William A. O'Neill Armory in Hartford Conn. (Jessica Hill, Pool/AP)

Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy speaks after being sworn in for his second term, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015, inside the William A. O'Neill Armory in Hartford Conn. (Jessica Hill, Pool/AP)

Gov. Dannel Malloy announced a legislative proposal that would allow Connecticut retailers to lower the cost of alcoholic beverages, according to a Sunday press release from Malloy’s office.

Senate Bill 14, “An Act Ensuring the Regional Competitiveness of Connecticut’s Liquor Prices,” would remove a 1981 mandate that retailers sell certain products, specifically alcohol, at an artificially high price set by wholesalers.

That mandate only affects retailers or other sellers of alcoholic beverages meant to be consumed off-site. The new proposal is not expected to directly affect bars’ pricing.

“The proposal will put the authority to determine the prices of these products back into the hands of retailers and out of the hands of government,” the press release said.

Connecticut is the only state in the region with a minimum price for alcoholic beverages.

“The governor is proposing that the law be modified to allow retailers to sell wine and liquor using a more reasonable, logical criteria: actual cost paid,” the press release said. “This is the same standard used in neighboring states in the Northeast.”

Malloy is quoted in the press release calling this move “the common sense thing to do.”

The press release described it as a part of a broader effort by Malloy’s administration to reform liquor laws, which has previously allowed stores to sell alcoholic beverages on Sundays and stay open later.


Christopher McDermott is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at christopher.mcdermott@uconn.edu.