Connecticut cancels state managerial raises due to budget constraints

The Connecticut State Capitol building in Hartford, Connecticut. (Michelle Lee/Creative Commons)

The State of Connecticut issued a press release Monday evening stating that intended raises for managerial employees has been delayed for the third time, due to severe deficits in the state’s budget.

The Connecticut Office of Policy and Management (OPM) estimates that next year’s state budget will be short of at least $570 million, while the Office of Fiscal Analysis of the Connecticut General Assembly (OFA) projects that deficit as high as $900 million, according to the press release.

“We (the Administration) have a responsibility to the taxpayers of Connecticut not to move forward with managerial raises at a time when so many state programs will see reductions and while many state jobs are likely to be eliminated,” said the press release, which was signed by Gov. Malloy’s Chief of Staff Brian Durand and Secretary Ben Barnes.

The press release states that the raise delay does not reflect the work managers do for Connecticut’s people, and stresses that agency heads let managers know that their work is appreciated. Given the current issues with the state’s budget, “the increases are no longer feasible.”

This issue applies to state level agencies (managers at motor vehicle departments, transportation, social services, etc.), meaning it doesn’t apply to University of Connecticut employees directly, UConn spokesperson Stephanie Reitz said.

“That being said, the only UConn non-union staff who received pay increases during this fiscal year were 16 employees whose salaries are less than $60,000,” Reitz said.

UConn employees in this job category are usually administrative assistants, earning more than $60,000. Non-union employees earning more than $60,000 didn’t receive a raise, Reitz said.

“UConn has been deferring increases for non-union employees earning more than $60,000 and intends to continue deferring them due to financial conditions,” Reitz said.