Sprint network used for low-cost Internet service to college students

Susquehanna Mobile will partner with Sprint to provide a new mobile Internet service to college and university students, faculty and staff. (Photo courtesy of SusquehannaMobile.com)

A technology non-profit organization is offering a new mobile Internet service to college and university students, faculty and staff.

Susquehanna Mobile Cares Program, based in Pennsylvania, will use the Sprint 4G LTE network exclusively, offering service plans of 30 gigabytes and more for less than $16 per month.

“To launch the program, customers that sign up before May 31, 2016 can get six continuous months of service, plus the new 4G LTE equipment, for a one-time charge of only $175.00,” said a Susquehanna Mobile press release. “Or, they can choose 12 continuous months of service, plus the new 4G LTE equipment, for a one-time charge of only $250.00.”

Todd Snyder, president of Susquehanna Mobile, said consistent Internet access is invaluable for a modern education.

“The objective of the program, aside from offering an economic alternative, is to help students maintain a good clean access to Internet service,” said Todd Snyder, president of Susquehanna Mobile.

Snyder acknowledged that many universities offer some kind of Internet service on their campuses, but he said that this program can fill the gaps not covered by universities.

“It’s nice to have a backup that is inexpensive and that you can take on the town,” Snyder said.

Much of Susquehanna Mobile’s work focuses on making Internet accessible to the public, using Internet to empower and educating people new to various technologies on how to make the most of them.

Basic Internet training is now commonplace in K-12 education, but not all students have access to it at home and not all parents, particularly those who are older or poorer, have extensive knowledge on how to make the best of it, Snyder said.

“We help give parents the info they need to know if their kids are getting unrestricted Internet, and what the benefits and negatives of that might be,” Snyder said.

Snyder hopes that the education college-age students and professionals get can be reinvested into K-12 education.

“We’d really like universities to get more involved with K-12,” Snyder said. “It’s students ability to mentor that can get younger students inspired and excited about education.”


Chris McDermott is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at christopher.mcdermott@uconn.edu.