Roundtable: The best and worst places for class on campus

A classic Arjona scene: students looking disinterested due to their surrounding environements. (File photo/The Daily Campus)

Whether you love or hate going to class, you have to admit that some places on campus are much better than others. Here’s the DC Life section’s picks for best and worst places to have class.

Anokh Palakurthi: The worst place to have class on campus, in my opinion, is probably one of the math and science buildings. Sure, they’re technically near Jorgensen and the Student Union. It’s not exactly far away, but being in them will make you feel so deflated. The small size, strange smell and claustrophobic feel the classrooms give you doesn’t exactly create a positive impression either. Then again, maybe my memories of the place come from all the exceptionally boring introductory math and science courses I had there. In fact, that’s probably it. But wouldn’t you get a bad taste from seeing students break down and cry before their upcoming physics midterms?

Marlese Lessing: Whoever designed the Arjona building has most likely never actually sat down and taken notes in a class. It’s actually an architectural marvel in how awful the experience is. The seats are made and angled in such a way that no matter how you sit, you are incredibly uncomfortable. Forget crossing your legs, because that will just make the postcard-sized desk fall back into its storage slot, causing your notes to scatter. Good luck taking notes by the way, because the chances for hearing the professor with the awful acoustics are 30/70 at best. Not to mention when it gets hot, the conditions would probably violate USDA regulations for livestock transport. You actually start to question why they’re bulldozing CTC instead of this awful building.

Angie DeRosa: The art building is simultaneously one of the best and worst locations on campus to have a class in. If you couldn't tell by the name, the art building is home to the art and art history programs. As soon as you walk into the building, you can see the walls all lined with student artwork. Maybe art isn't your thing, but seeing all the exhibits on display is my favorite draw to being in the art building. You get to really see how talented some fellow huskies are. My only reason behind why it's the worst is because of how far away it is. If you don't live in the vicinity of South Campus or Storrs Center, then it is a long walk if you miss the bus, but the creative environment makes the hike worth it.


Angie DeRosa is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at angelina.derosa@uconn.edu.  She tweets @theangiederosa.

Marlese Lessing is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at marlese.lessing@uconn.edu.

Anokh Palakurthi is associate life editor for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at anokh.palakurthi@uconn.edu. He tweets @DC_Anokh.