Oct. 2 - 6: This week in history

  On Oct. 5, 1921, the World Series was broadcast on radio for the first time. The game was between the New York Yankees and the New York Giants.  (Keith Allison/Flickr Creative Commons)

 

On Oct. 5, 1921, the World Series was broadcast on radio for the first time. The game was between the New York Yankees and the New York Giants.  (Keith Allison/Flickr Creative Commons)

The anniversaries of several important events that helped shape the world in which we live will take place over the coming days. Here is a quick rundown of this week in history:

On Oct. 2, 1836, Charles Darwin returned to England from his five year expedition aboard the Beagle, the ship he travelled on surveying and studying the life of various islands in the Pacific Ocean. The information he recorded from this trip would provide the bulk of his research that would be published in his 1859 book “The Origins of Species by Means of Natural Selection.” As the first major scientific work on the theory of evolution, it would spark a worldwide debate among scientists and scholars about the development of species that continues to this day.

On Oct. 3, 1993, the first battle of Mogadishu took place between American, Pakistani, Malaysian and Somali forces. It would be the most high profile battle of the Somali Civil War, which lasted for decades. The engagement originally started on the morning of Oct. 3 with the intention of capturing the leader of one of the Somali rebel factions. This mission was supposed to last only an hour or two, but disaster struck when two different Black Hawk helicopters were transporting American forces were brought down by enemy RPGs.

Both helicopters were forced to crash-land inside the city, and American leaders scrambled to devise a rescue plan. Two Delta force snipers volunteered to land and protect one of the downed helicopters and secure the area until help arrived. Despite their efforts, the crash site was overrun by Somali forces, resulting in the death of both men and the capture of the last surviving pilot. This would start an international crisis as news broke about the battle and word spread of the lost aircraft.

Rescue forces were finally able to reach the other Black Hawk on the morning on Oct. 4, and all wounded personnel were safely brought back to the American compound. Diplomatic negotiations were successful in securing the return of the killed Delta operatives and the captured pilot. This events would be chronicalized in the internationally-famous book, “Black Hawk Down,” which would later be made into a film of the same name.

On Oct. 5, 1921, the World Series was broadcast on radio for the first time. The game was between the New York Yankees and the New York Giants. This was the Yankees first appearance in the World Series and they would eventually lose in eight games. Featuring some of the greatest players of all time, Yankees star Babe Ruth was only able to play sporadically due to injuries sustained during the regular season.

Since both teams were based in New York, the whole series took place at Polo Grounds in Manhattan. With widespread interest due to the game’s broadcast over the radio, this World Series ushered in a new wave of popularity for baseball as massive new crowds were able to listen to games more easily. While the Giants were the eventual victors, the Yankees would go on to play in more World Series than other team in history and currently hold 27 championship titles.


Seamus McKeever is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at seamus.mckeever@uconn.edu.