Voter technology to be routinely audited by Connecticut Secretary of the State

The purpose of auditing the primary results and matching them against machine totals is to “affirm the integrity of the vote,” according to Secretary of the State’s Communications Director Gabe Rosenberg. (Amar Batra/The Daily Campus)

Eight of Connecticut’s voting precincts have been randomly selected by Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill to be audited following the Sept. 12 primary election, according to a statement released by her office.  

“Protecting the integrity of our elections is my most important role, and Connecticut voters can be proud that we have some of the most stringent audit laws in the country,” Merrill said. “Between making it easier for Connecticut citizens to register and vote, an increased focus on cybersecurity and our scrupulous audit process, the rights of the voter are our highest priority.”

In adherence to Connecticut General Statutes 9-320f, five percent of the optical scanning precincts were randomly selected to have their results audited. Four alternate locations were also selected. The complete list of locations is included below.

According to the Connecticut General Statutes, the manual audit will consist of a hand count of paper ballots that were cast and counted by voting machines. The totals generated in the hand count will then be compared to the results reported by the voting machine on the day of the primary.

The purpose of auditing the primary results and matching them against machine totals is to “affirm the integrity of the vote,” according to Secretary of the State’s Communications Director Gabe Rosenberg.

“Connecticut… was the first state in New England to require a comprehensive audit of primary results,” Rosenberg said.

On campus, UConnPIRG has voiced their support for the routine auditing of Connecticut elections. UConnPIRG’s Democracy Campaign Coordinator Matthew Byanyima reiterated UConnPIRG’s stance as a group for fair, free and clean elections.

“Routine audits should definitely be invoked and done on a regular basis. It shouldn’t be a controversy to merely look over whether or not the results that were generated or collected were verified,” said Byanyima. “Free and fair elections are very important because voters need to be able to have confidence in their elections. Voters need to be able to trust that whom they’re voting for or whom they’re electing are indeed the legitimate winners, and its one of the most basic aspects of a democracy.”

The results of the audit will be analyzed by the University of Connecticut, the Secretary of the State’s Office and the State Elections Enforcement Commission. The results will be made available to the public, according to a statement from Merrill’s office.

Alternate polling places:

List of polling places to be audited: 

  • New London – New London High School
  • Bridgeport – Voting District 137
  • Greenwich – Voting District 10
  • Farmington – Municipal Buildings – FHS Library – Town Hall
  • New Haven – Barnard School
  • Stratford – District 5
  • Newtown – Head O Meadow School Cafeteria
  • Newtown – Middle School Gym A
  • Bridgeport – Voting District 135
  • New London – Nathan Hale School
  • Cheshire – Doolittle School – District 5-3
  • Greenwich – Voting District 12 

Andrew Miano is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at andrew.miano@uconn.edu.