Malloy vetoes state budget

Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy delivers his budget address to members of the house and senate inside the Hall of the House at the state Capitol in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy delivers his budget address to members of the house and senate inside the Hall of the House at the state Capitol in Hartford, Conn., Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

Gov. Dannel Malloy vetoed the Republican budget that proposed to cut $309 million from UConn’s budget on Thursday.

“It’s violative of the law, it’s not balanced, it doesn’t do the things they say it will do, it doesn’t send to the communities the money they say it will send on a net basis,”’ Malloy said to WTNH.

Students at the university expressed their support for the governor’s actions.

“I think it’s definitely good for the university that (Malloy) is looking out for us and (that) he understands what UConn does for the state,” Ben Townson, a first-semester geoscience major, said.

Following the passage of the budget, UConn students, faculty, staff and supporters expressed widespread criticism of it through rallies in the Hugh S. Greer Field House and at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford last week.

“The funding and support of UConn is a public policy matter for our students and state. It’s not about me or anyone else,” UConn President Susan Herbst said at the Board of Trustees meeting Wednesday.

Tyler Porcello, a fifth-semester political science major, said he thought Malloy’s move to veto the budget was “great” but that the implications of not having a budget remain a concern.  

“I’m concerned that we don’t have a budget. I would rather (the legislature) come up with a budget in the coming days so UConn doesn’t have to take as big (of) a hit,” Porcello said.

Alexia Radkermani, a third-semester biological science major, said she also approved of the veto.

“I didn’t approve of the budget;  it was too detrimental (to UConn),” Radkermani said.

If the state legislature is unable to pass a new budget before Oct. 1, an executive order Malloy signed earlier this year will go into effect. The order cuts educational aid to hundreds of municipalities.

“It’d be better if the legislature would cooperate and hopefully they still can while they have a chance (and create a budget that) won’t raise taxes too much and still provide educational aid to the state,” Townson said.


Anna Zarra Aldrich is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at anna.aldrich@uconn.edu. She tweets @ZarraAnna.