UConn’t Believe This: UConn urban myths and legends

A tradition typically mentioned during the course of a prospective student’s visit is the belief that rubbing the Jonathan statue’s nose outside of Gampel will bring good luck and good grades. (File photo/The Daily Campus)

University of Connecticut superstitions are mentioned on tours and referenced in classes and during Husky for a Day visits.

While a comprehensive list of all the superstitions some UConn students choose to live their lives by may be improbable, some of the predominantly followed traditions or urban legends can be composed in an in-exhaustive list.

The seal outside of the library:

The legend of the seal says that if you walk over the seal, you disrespectful swine, you will fail to graduate in four years.

Now, the question is, does this mean you can graduate in three years? Or three years and a semester rather than four years? What are the loopholes in this myth? Are the consequences exclusively an inability to graduate in four years or under?

“Yes, I’ve crossed the seal,” Madison Thompson, a fifth semester speech, language and hearing sciences major said.

“I crossed it, but I was immediately nervous after,” Thompson continued. “I noticed I crossed the seal, cursed, and kept walking.”

Don’t worry folks, as of now, she is still scheduled to graduate on time.

Jonathan’s nose:

Another tradition typically mentioned during the course of a prospective student’s visit is the belief that rubbing the Jonathan statue’s nose outside of Gampel will bring good luck and good grades.

This legend is one of a similar series across the world. The renowned “Charging Bull” statue on Wall St. in Manhattan, installed in 1989, has been visited by tourists seeking luck from rubbing its brass genitals ever since.

While UConn students would never violate their beloved husky in such a manner, real or inanimate, we do often rub his nose.

Catch a visiting dad in cargo shorts and New Balance sneakers rubbing his nose too after taking a picture with his engineering-major son.

Soup Doop man:

Yes, we all know him as “soup doop” (occasionally spelled soop doop or shoop doop), but Luis has been a staple of the UConn Student Union for years.

Spreading love and positivity with his slogan, “Soup doop!” Luis encourages students to work their hardest. Passing through on a routine tour, the youngins that hear “Super duper baby” from across the Union might not understand, but true UConn students will.

Continue being super duper Luis, we appreciate you.

The Storrs brothers wind tunnel:

Thank you, Augustus and Charles Storrs for donating your land to create one of the best schools in the country.

But no thanks to the rumored Texan brothers that constructed the original buildings on campus. Rumor has it that the pair of architects were commissioned to build our trusty school and did so in their own fashion.

The problem was that the architectural ideals for Texas do not transmute well to the New England climate and agriculture.

Using the structural formations they were accustomed to, legend says these architects formed our campus into a wind-tunnel.

The most common of the UConn urban legends cannot be confirmed, at least not easily, but are known by most UConn students.

These legends can be added to; including the absolutely iconic jalapeno, bacon, mac and cheese kid from 2015, or the unreasonably long Dunkin Donuts line in the Union.

As the years go on, more legends will arise and more traditions will be formed, but one thing will always remain; our adoration of Jonathan the Husky. He’s a good boy.


Abby Brone is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at abigail.brone@uconn.edu.