UConn students offer various opinions on 280-character Tweets

“The 280 character limit changes Twitter,” Sharlow said. “There are no more short blurbs but longer messages, with more developed thoughts.” (Courtesy/Twitter)

University of Connecticut students expressed varying opinions on Twitter’s recent update that increased the number of characters allowed in tweets from 140 to 280.

Fiona Brock, third-semester communications major, said she noticed tweets are much longer after the update.

“I don’t want to read through long tweets, because I get bored quickly,” Brock said.

The change is part of Twitter’s plan to increase user growth and use, according to BBC News.

According to a Sept. 26 post on Twitter’s official media blog, when people do not need to fit their thoughts into 140 characters, they tweet more often.

Those who use longer tweets gain more followers and engagement, according to BBC News.

“More space makes it easier for people to fit their thoughts in a tweet… and send tweets faster than ever,” Aliza Rosen, Twitter’s product manager, said in a Nov. 7 post on Twitter’s official media blog.

Twitter’s brevity and users’ timeline experience should not substantially change, according to Rosen.

Aishling Brookes, third-semester biology major, said she feels tweets have gotten longer after the update.

“At first I thought it was a great idea, but now it's kind of annoying because the tweets are too long,” Brookes said.

Rosen said only 5 percent of tweets had more than 140 characters, while only 2 percent were longer than 190 characters.

Twitter will continue to work to make the site easier for everyone to use, Rosen said.

Haley Sharlow, third-semester environmental studies major, said the update has changed the way people use Twitter.

“The 280 character limit changes Twitter,” Sharlow said. “There are no more short blurbs but longer messages, with more developed thoughts.”


Roisin Coleman is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at roisin.coleman@uconn.edu.