'Recasting the Confederacy: Monuments and Civil War Memory' lecture to be held Monday

The University of Connecticut Department of History will host a lecture Monday from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Konover Auditorium at the Dodd Research Center titled “Recasting the Confederacy: Monuments and Civil War Memory” as part of its Fall 2017 Draper Workshop Series.  (Mark Theriot/Flickr Creative Commons)

The University of Connecticut Department of History will host a lecture Monday from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Konover Auditorium at the Dodd Research Center titled “Recasting the Confederacy: Monuments and Civil War Memory” as part of its Fall 2017 Draper Workshop Series.  (Mark Theriot/Flickr Creative Commons)

The University of Connecticut Department of History will host a lecture Monday from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Konover Auditorium at the Dodd Research Center titled “Recasting the Confederacy: Monuments and Civil War Memory” as part of its Fall 2017 Draper Workshop Series.

Manisha Sinha, Draper Chair in American History at UConn, said she believes this event is relevant with current political events and groups such as Neo-Nazis who support the prevention of Confederate monuments being torn down. Sinha said there are also still outdated ideas of the Civil War in the broader public.

“I really wanted to have a public conversation, not just about the meaning of the memorials and why people wanted to take them down and why the right is using it as a sign of protest,” Sinha said. “But also to really talk about Civil War history, talk about what caused the war.”

According to Sinha, many historians are interviewed and write for the broader public about the Civil War. Sinha said she finds the three guest speakers she invited to be thoughtful when speaking about the current debate over the Civil War and its meaning.

Sinha said one of the speakers is David Blight, history professor and Gilder Lehrman Center Director at Yale University. According to Sinha, Blight has a perspective on the war that she finds interesting and different from hers.

W. Fitzhugh Brundage, William B. Umstead Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina, will also speak, Sinha said.

“It was really important to have a point of view from the South, but not the conventional view,” Sinha said.

Nina Silber, Professor of American History at Boston University, will be the third speaker, Sinha said. Silber has done research on how the Nazis emulated the Civil War that Sinha finds interesting.

Sinha said she believes that historians should share their knowledge and really engage citizens in conversation.

“Educating citizenry is the best safeguard for our democracy,” Sinha said.


Kimberly Nguyen is the associate managing editor for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at kimberly.nguyen@uconn.edu.