Winners And Losers: UConn Field Hockey, always a winner

The Huskies won the Big East Championship this weekend and now have their sights set on the NCAA crown. They remain undefeated this year and expect to be the No. 1 overall seed in the upcoming tournament. (Charlotte Lao/The Daily Campus)

With another week in the books, let’s look at the winners and losers from the wide world of sports.

Winner: UConn Field Hockey

The Huskies won the Big East Championship this weekend and now have their sights set on the NCAA crown. They remain undefeated this year and expect to be the No. 1 overall seed in the upcoming tournament.

Charlotte Veitner has led the way as the leading scorer for UConn this season.

Winner: Houston Astros

The Astros fulfilled their destiny by winning their first World Series in a seven-game series against the Los Angeles Dodgers. The team had the best record in the American League during the regular season, and defeated the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees en route to the championship.

The UConn star, George Springer earned a spot of immortality in baseball lore by tying a record for most home runs in a World Series with five. He earned the World Series MVP award for his heroics.

Loser: NFL

America’s most popular league is spiraling into chaos, with pressing issues on the game’s physical and social levels. Football was miles ahead of the country’s other popular sports just a few years ago and, while it remains the favorite, its place does not appear to be as cemented as it once did. Five years ago, it would have been difficult to imagine football, the game that religiously lures most Americans to televisions each Sunday, could ever crumble or even crack.

But the cracks are beginning to form, and it begins with the lack of leadership at the head of the league. Commissioner Roger Goodell has more enemies than friends in the NFL these days and most of the league’s fans look poorly upon him as well. He has done nothing to fix any of the problems that football faces and as a result, ratings are declining heavily.

Players protesting racial injustices by kneeling during the National Anthem have created tremendous controversy throughout the league. While many fans support the protests, other have been irked by their presence on the field and have strayed from the sport.

But for most fans whose viewing tendencies are not influenced by pregame protests, there are other reasons for decreasing interest. At the end of the day, what matters most is the quality of the content the league is providing. Lately, games have been less interesting and losing a spark. Blowouts are increasing and, by the time the game gets to the third quarter, a fan might begin to wonder why they dedicated their entire Sunday afternoon to this slow moving show.

For the long term wellbeing of the league, concerns about CTE could cause significant detriment. People are beginning to realize that playing football can cause irreparable damage to one’s brain, raising the question of what the NFL is doing to protect its players.

Although they are not doing much, the reality is there is not much that they can fix. Football is simply a dangerous sport, and it always has been. But now everyone is realizing the specific health effects playing it causes.

Fewer parents are signing their kids up for football now as fear of head injury increases. In the future, this could cause interest in the sport to fall, at least to some extent. The combination of the various hurdles standing in the NFL’s way will be tough to overcome as time goes on. Of course, fans will continue to love football, but can the NFL come away from so many impediments unscathed?


Dylan Barrett is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus.  He can be reached via email at dylan.barrett@uconn.edu.