Commuter Corner: The drive home

I’ve been noticing this one trend lately, as I commute the 40 minutes to UConn three days a week and as I drive to work and church: the drive home is faster. (Tyler Benton/The Daily Campus)

Alright so, a little background information on me. I currently work at a restaurant near my hometown with my sister, who isn’t even a year younger than me. I also have two babysitting jobs, one in the morning and one in the evening. Occasionally I babysit for a third family when I have the chance. I attend two church services on Sundays so that I can write a weekly column during one of them, and then I visit my pastor’s house with a group of high school graduates to hang out.

I’ve been noticing this one trend lately, as I commute the 40 minutes to UConn three days a week and as I drive to work and church: the drive home is faster.

I don’t know what it is, but the drive home is almost always faster than the drive there. I’m careful not to speed, especially at night where the winding, poorly paved backroads are the ones ferrying me to my destination. I’ve also considered the traffic, which is significantly less at 10 at night than at noon, but I don’t think that’s the cause either.

I think the main reason the drive home is faster is has nothing to do with actual time it takes. It’s the fact that I don’t look at the time at all. I don’t need to be somewhere. The obligation and responsibility are not present. On the ride back, I am simply heading to my house for some food, to get some homework done, to get some rest. There is no pressure, no real worries. It’s just my family that I can escape from whenever I want by shutting the door to my bedroom. Granted, they are the type to knock incessantly after I shut the door, but that’s what to expect with three younger siblings.

As I was thinking about this, I realized how lucky I was to have a place like that. I’m sure that for some people, the drive home would be arduous and full of stress. For some people, they may not even have a home to drive to. How it is for me is a rarity of sorts, and I’m thankful for it. I would be in a huge amount of debt without it. Because of my home, because of the family I have, I have a smoother ride back. Worries do not exist, just the need for sleep, or the want of conversation or endless desire for more food. No matter what obligations I have during the week, I can have peace at home. As long as I hide in my room, away from the sister who wants hugs or the brother who wants to talk sports with me or the other sister demanding I kiss the dog. They are a lot to handle sometimes, but I love them. They make the drive home all the more quick.


Hannah Desrosiers is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at hannah.desrosiers@uconn.edu.