Husky Crossing: Students react to the addition of paw prints on campus crosswalks

The crosswalks on Gilbert Road have been repainted in order to look like husky tracks left by everyone's favorite dog Jonathan. (Jason Jiang/The Daily Campus)

Following the Gilbert Road re-pavement project, paw prints were recently painted in the crosswalks of Gilbert Road at the University of Connecticut’s Storrs Campus.

“Since we had to repaint the crosswalk anyway after the paving project, we decided to add something a little whimsical that would make people smile and feel UConn pride,” Reitz said.

I think the paw prints unite us in a way, everyone is so diverse at UConn but we are all Huskies and the paw prints are a constant reminder of our school spirit.
— Allied health major George Vallejo

According to Reitz, federal regulations require two painted parallel lines at crosswalks and leave decisions about the neutral space to the local road agency.  Diagonal lines are usually painted within crosswalks for higher visibility, which will continue in the busier intersections on campus. UConn’s facilities office worked with the marketing directors to get the stencils for the paw prints.

Reactions to the paw prints around campus have been positive;from students that have noticed them on campus and on UConn’s social media accounts. (Amar Batra/The Daily Campus)

“I remember I stopped in the middle of the crosswalk to get a better look at the paw prints. It was something so small, but it instantly improved my mood. I think it is a great addition to campus and there should be more paw prints all around campus,” seventh-semester psychology major Alisha Rolon said.

According to Reitz, reactions to the paw prints around campus have been positive;from students that have noticed them on campus and on UConn’s social media accounts.

“I think the paw prints unite us in a way, everyone is so diverse at UConn but we are all Huskies and the paw prints are a constant reminder of our school spirit,” fifth-semester allied health major George Vallejo said.

According to Reitz, the busier intersections need to have diagonal lines and UConn will look to continue to paint paw prints on the smaller side streets of campus.  Reitz said it is possible there will not only be more, but much bigger paw prints, to really make them stand out around campus.


Kristina Carretero is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at kristina.carretero@uconn.edu.