UConn considering putting out voluntary conservation notice

There are signs posted about conserving water in most Residence Hall bathrooms, asking students to “Stop the Drop!” and be conscious about reducing their water waste in their daily routines. (File Photo/The Daily Campus)

The University of Connecticut is considering putting out a voluntary conservation notice, despite drought levels dropping from a moderate drought in 99 percent of the state to 84.87 percent of the state being drought free, said Dr. Michael Dietz, an Associate Extension Educator with a Ph.D in Water Resources from UConn.

According to Dietz, the drought that had affected Connecticut last year is no longer prevalent to most of the state due to the high levels of participation in conservation efforts that has driven the state out of the drought.

UConn is considering this step in preserving water because of the issues it has had in the past with its source of water, the Fenton River, according to Dietz

The University’s Office of Environmental Policy said that from Sept. 9-15 in 2005, there was a stretch of the river that ran completely dry, which raised questions about how to better preserve that water resource.

In a statement from the University, they promised that they, “made considerable efforts to review, improve, and implement emergency and long-standing water conservation goals for the campus and surrounding communities dependent on the university water supply.”

Since this incident, UConn has been constantly monitoring the rate at which we draw water from the Fenton River.

“We stop pumping if we reach the trigger point, which is 3 cubic meters per second,” said Dietz. “We have currently stopped pumping because we have reached that point.”

Dietz said the conservation notice, if realized, isn’t a cause for great alarm but rather is a reminder to cut back on our water usage.

There are signs posted about conserving water in most Residence Hall bathrooms, asking students to “Stop the Drop!” and be conscious about reducing their water waste in their daily routines. According to Dietz, “taking shorter showers is where students can really help out.”


Molly Desrochers is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at molly.desrochers@uconn.edu.