Center for Career Development to host 'Internship and Co-op Week'

The internship and co-op week will include interviewing and a workshop discussing what is appropriate to wear for an interview and resume-building workshops, according to the website.(Olivia Stenger/The Daily Campus)

UConn’s Center for Career Development (CCD) will host the “Internship and Co-op Week,”
a week-long internship prep with seminars, tips and ways to develop connections from Feb. 5 through 8.

Internships as defined by UConn’s Center for Career Development, are “work/learning experiences that provide a hands-on way for students to confirm choice of major and/or career in a way that is more substantial than a part-time job.”

Often, internships are paid, but they can also be done for credit through UConn. Internships for credit can be found through the Center for Career Development website, as well as the internships offered through individual majors and departments.

For instance, both the English and journalism departments offer internships for credit during the fall and spring semesters as well as the summer term, according to the programs’ websites.

Academic internships are those for which the student earns credit, while a non-academic internship is one that does not earn credit, according to the website.

UConn offers internships both on and off campus, according to the center.

On-campus internships include UCTV, Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, Department of Transportation and Jorgensen Center of Performing Arts, according to the website.

According to the CCD’s website, off-campus internships are offered through five categories and search engines: a national search engine, industry or niche specific, international internships and co-ops, post graduate opportunities and housing and relocation.  

In contrast to an internship, a co-op is a “paid, full-time working opportunity lasting at least the length of a semester,” according to the center’s website.

Co-ops must occur while the student is still enrolled at UConn and although the students do not earn credit and are working full-time, the participants maintain their student status, according to the Center for Career Development.

The website said co-ops also allow the participants to opt out of a meal plan and housing, and that they are allowed to pay a small continuing education fee rather than full tuition.

The internship and co-op week will include interviewing and a workshop discussing what is appropriate to wear for an interview and resume-building workshops, according to the website.

A resume “highlights educational background, experiences, accomplishments, skills, and interests” that are used to showcase your abilities to potential employers, according to CCD.

The center offers 20-minute resume critiques daily in the Wilbur Cross building, which can be booked online.

Cover letters are often not required, but are a good way to “bolster your candidacy,” according to the center. 

A cover letter, described as “a standard business letter that serves as an introduction to your résumé and as a tool to market you to employers,” can also be edited by the Center for Career Development.


Abby Brone is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at abigail.brone@uconn.edu.