Women's March preview

This year’s marches mark the one year anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration and come in the wake of the nationwide reckoning of sexual harassment and assault known as the Me Too movement. (Amar Batra/The Daily Campus)

One year after the Women’s Marches in Washington, D.C. and across the country, demonstrators will again be taking to the streets in protest of sexism, racism and bigotry the weekend of Jan 20.

The 2018 Hartford Women’s March will begin at 12:30 p.m. with a march from the north side of Corning Fountain to the Connecticut State Capitol. From 1-3 p.m. there will be speakers, voter registration and tables from activist organizations, according to the Women’s March website.

“Signs, chants, gear and enthusiasm are entirely encouraged,” the website said.

Marches are also planned for other nearby cities, including Boston, Providence and New York City, as well as for cities throughout the country, including Chicago, Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

A “March to the Polls” is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 20 in Washington, D.C. Event organizers say the purpose of the march is to “urge women to persist in building their political power.”

“The Women’s March has created a powerful movement that has ignited thousands of activists and new leaders,” Women’s March co-president Tamika D. Mallory said in a statement. “In 2018, we must turn our work into action ahead of the midterms. This new initiative will address voter registration and voter suppression head-on.”

University of Connecticut students attended the Women’s Marches last year and plan on supporting the movement again.

Then-senior Olivia Bonnanzio said she felt empowered to see the turnout at Hartford’s 2017 rally to the Daily Campus last January.

“I think it’s good to know there are still people who think women are awesome,” Bonnanzio said. “The showing everywhere, no matter what city, has me proud, and it shows we won’t go down without a fight.”

Fourth-semester political science major Miranda Garcia said though she didn’t attend a march last year, she hopes to go to one this year.

“In light of the current administration, it’s important to bring awareness to issues of oppression, human rights and equality,” Garcia said. “To be surrounded by women, allies and activists from different places and backgrounds all fighting for the same thing would be really cool.”

This year’s marches mark the one year anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration and come in the wake of the nationwide reckoning of sexual harassment and assault known as the Me Too movement.

“We’re in a hell of a fight—probably, for most of us, the fight of our lives—but we are seeing victories. We are seeing progress,” Mallory told The Guardian.


Gabriella Debenedictis is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at gabriella.debenedictis@uconn.edu.