Government reopens, Murphy and Blumenthal vote against spending bill

Murphy told the Hartford Courant that Connecticut’s thousands of “Dreamers,” people brought to the United States as children who now face deportation after President Trump ended DACA, were a factor in his decision to vote against the resolution.

Connecticut Senators Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal were among the 19 senators who voted against yesterday’s resolution that reopened the government after last weekend’s shutdown.

Murphy tweeted that he voted against the bill because it’s “bad for Connecticut.”

“Health centers run out of money. Dreamers still in crisis. Less work for our defense contractors. Bad bill for our state,” he tweeted.

Murphy told the Hartford Courant that Connecticut’s thousands of “Dreamers,” people brought to the United States as children who now face deportation after President Trump ended DACA, were a factor in his decision to vote against the resolution.

“I looked at this agreement in its totality,” Murphy said. “I acknowledge that it’s an important step forward for Republicans to guarantee a debate on the Dream Act but there’s no guarantee that it passes. There’s still a real chance these kids in Connecticut are going to face deportation in March.”

Blumenthal told the Hartford Courant he voted against the bill because he thought it would lead to another shutdown.

“One of the reasons I voted against this...measure is that I have no confidence we will be in a different position three weeks from now,” Blumenthal said. “But I hope my colleagues are right.”

The federal government shut down last weekend due to the expiration of its current spending bill and its inability to pass a new one. It reopened yesterday after lawmakers struck a deal to fund it until Feb. 8.

The bipartisan resolution extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program for another six years and delays or suspends a handful of tax increases that were to help pay for insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

Connecticut took 31st place in a ranking of how much each state was affected by the shutdown.

The 50 states and Washington, DC were ranked by WalletHub based on share of federal jobs, federal contract dollars per capita, percentage of children under the (CHIP), small business lending per capita, real estate as percentage of gross state product and access to national parks.

Connecticut received a score of 27.62 out of 100, with 100 representing the largest impact from the government shutdown. Its low ranking was due to its position as the second-smallest host of federal jobs and fourth-lowest host of CHIP recipients.

The most affected states included Maryland and Virginia, while the least affected were Indiana, Michigan and Minnesota.


Gabriella Debenedictis is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at gabriella.debenedictis@uconn.edu.