Rallies planned if Mueller is fired

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Proactive plans for rallies across the country have been made in the event that Special Counsel Robert Mueller is fired, according to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Connecticut rally locations include Willimantic, New Haven, Hartford and others.

The rallies, organized by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) People Power grassroots movement, are being held to show the importance of a fair and honest government, according to Batya Diamond, the organizer of the Norwalk rally.  

“The bottom line is that no one is above the law,” Diamond said. “It’s really the message that the president doesn’t have the power to fire the Special Counsel. [He needs to allow] the investigation to proceed unimpeded. The public wants to see the truth come out. We want to see the results of a full investigation.”  

According to MoveOn (www.act.moveon.org), the planners of the rallies, demonstrations held in Connecticut are slated for Danbury, East Haddam, Hartford, Middletown, New Haven, New London, Norwalk and Willimantic.

“Local organizers are already making contingency plans for protests in Norwalk,” a recent press release from the ACLU said.   

If Mueller is fired before 2:00 p.m. EST, organized protests will begin at 5:00 p.m., according to the press release.  If he is fired after 2:00 p.m. EST, organized protests will start at 12:00.

University of Connecticut students have expressed that they are interested in joining the movement against the president’s actions in case of the termination.

“I truly believe that no one is above the law,” second-semester political science major Lily Muzzarelli said.  “I think people empower and can manipulate when they make mistakes, but the law is universal to all.”

Protest organizers have encouraged students to participate in the events.

“If you are concerned about abuses by the Trump administration (and its enablers),” Diamond wrote in an email, “in addition to making your voice heard at the ballot box in November, join together with members of your community to speak out!”


Luke Hajdasz is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at luke.hajdasz@uconn.edu.