Calista’s Cinema Conversations: Movies with inhuman characters

 Robots or man-made humanoid characters like “Wall-E” and “Edward Scissorhands” often find themselves alone or alienated when trying to enter human civilization.  These inhuman characters fascinate us humans. (HarshLight/Flickr Creative Commons)

Robots or man-made humanoid characters like “Wall-E” and “Edward Scissorhands” often find themselves alone or alienated when trying to enter human civilization. These inhuman characters fascinate us humans. (HarshLight/Flickr Creative Commons)

In light of the new season of “Doctor Who” coming out and the Thirteenth Doctor, Jodie Whittaker, receiving rave reviews from critics and audiences alike, I have decided to dedicate this week to films with characters that aren’t quite human, much like The Doctor.

Aliens are an interesting form for a character to take. In films like “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” or “Slither,” the aliens act as a parasite and inhabit the humans. In the case of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” this makes it hard for the remaining non-infected humans to survive, as the aliens look just like their friends and family. Some aliens, such as the characters from the “Thor” movies and the “Guardians of the Galaxy” series are benevolent and the heroes of their stories. More curious aliens such as “E.T.” or “Starman” are portrayed as misunderstood but lovable.

Robots or man-made humanoid characters like “Wall-E” and “Edward Scissorhands” often find themselves alone or alienated when trying to enter human civilization. Cyborgs like “The Terminator” are supposed to blend in enough to fulfill what they set out to do.

Films that normalize these non-human creatures in society, like the “Men in Black” series, “I, Robot” or “Pacific Rim” create the antagonists to be the inhumans. These type of plots are man verses unknown and tend to be sympathetic towards humans.

Children’s films centering around non-humans that are still great to watch at any age that center around non-humans are “Toy Story,” “Monsters Inc.,” “Megamind” and “Spongebob Squarepants: The Movie.” In these, the non-humans are given a problem as opposed to being the problem, and they use unique and fantastical means of solving it. Due to their animated nature, these characters are able to do what humans cannot.

The classic supernatural creatures such as ghosts, monsters, werewolves, vampires, demons and many others are always a great topic for directors to dive into. “Creature features” are a safe bet for directors to make remakes or sequels of. Films like “Dracula,” “Frankenstein,” “Godzilla,” “King Kong” and “The Wolfman” are sometimes remade or the storylines are continued a little too often for most critics. Unfortunately for people who might be tired of these movies, directors will continue to make them as it never fails to bring in a secure amount of money for film industries.

As humans, we are fascinated with the unknown. Filmmakers have time and time again taken advantage of our enthrallment through the creation of these kinds of films. Fortunately for the movie industry, there are still a handful of exceptional films with original plots being produced today, it has just become harder to find them.


Calista Giroux is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at calista.giroux@gmail.com.