Mochrie and Sherwood delight audiences at Family Weekend comedy special

Throughout the night, Mochrie and Sherwood performed many unscripted and unrehearsed skits using both audience suggestions and direct participation. When they needed a setting for their bit they would turn to members of the audience who shouted out things like “a volcano,” “the international space station,” “Pocotopaug” and even a fruit-bat hatchery. (Congyang An/The Daily Campus)

Armed with nothing but an audience, an iPod and their wits, improv comedians Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood brought their “Scared Scriptless” comedy tour to UConn on Saturday night.

Mochrie and Sherwood are best known for their work on the Emmy-nominated series “Whose Line Is It Anyway.” Many of the show’s funniest skits and scenes can be found as videos, gifs and memes, showing that their work keeps audiences laughing years later.

Throughout the night, Mochrie and Sherwood performed many unscripted and unrehearsed skits using both audience suggestions and direct participation. When they needed a setting for their bit they would turn to members of the audience who shouted out things like “a volcano,” “the international space station,” “Pocotopaug” and even a fruit-bat hatchery.

But it wasn’t one of these unique locations that stumped Mochrie during a skit where Sherwood had to get Mochrie to confess to a crime that the audience and Sherwood had come up with. Instead it was the word ‘building’ that eluded Mochrie for several minutes, much to Sherwood’s frustration and the audience’s amusement.

But they didn’t just leave this comedic gem there. Instead, they played off it throughout the rest of the night, something fifth-semester exercise science major Mikayla Bibbins appreciated and thought was the funniest part of the show.

“I think it adds to the quality of the show,” Bibbins said. “It gets the audience back into it, continues on the joke which helps with the flow of the show.”

Another highlight of the night was the very first scene in which Mochrie and Sherwood called up two audience members and instructed them to direct all their movements like puppeteers as they pretended to be French cowboys mending a fence.

Third-semester digital media and design major Katelyn Jepsen particularly enjoyed this part.

“My favorite part was when [audience participants] were leading them. That was really cool,” Jepsen said. “The audience members were awkward at first and then kind of they got into it. The girl was hilarious. Her small movements where she was like ‘oh, this would be funny’ kind of like she was comedic too. That’s what made it funny.”

Bibbins also thought that improvisation is a unique way to keep audiences engaged.

“I think [improv] works because it caters to the audience, Bibbins said. “It’s specific to that audience so you feel more involved within the show instead of just watching them word for word.”

Kaitlyn Seeto, a third-semester math major, also appreciated Mochrie and Sherwood’s use of improv and audience participation because “it keeps everyone engaged.”

“When it’s just talking at the crowd it’s not as interesting,” Seeto said.

Overall, Mochrie and Sherwoods’ unique form of comedy using improv and audience contributions created a fun filled evening that kept audience laughing long after they left Jorgensen.


Alexis Taylor is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at alexis.taylor@uconn.edu.