Distress And De-stress: Stress management tips to help you keep your cool in time for winter break

 With finals approaching, it may be a good idea to take some time off from the studying and relax with man’s best friend, as it is known to be therapeutic. (Franco Vannini/Flickr Creative Commons)

With finals approaching, it may be a good idea to take some time off from the studying and relax with man’s best friend, as it is known to be therapeutic. (Franco Vannini/Flickr Creative Commons)

With finals approaching, many students are about to begin one of the if not the most stressful times of the semester. Like others, I struggle with feeling overwhelmed by the work I’m about to do before I even do it. So I procrastinate, all the while calling it de-stressing until it feels too late to get everything done, let alone carve out time to genuinely de-stress. But what do you do when you’re stressed about de-stressing?

You try to de-stress anyway.

Here are some tips:

1. Start by designating spaces that are work-free zones. This sets up boundaries for where you can truly relax versus where you have to get to work. The simple act of changing spaces can even be your first small accomplishment of the day.

2. I would also recommend hanging with man’s best friend because nothing is a better stress reliever than a golden retriever. In all seriousness, hanging out with a dog or any other pet can be therapeutic and leave you feeling replenished. If this means a quick trip home if you live close by, a stop at a friend’s place, visiting health education’s pet therapy sessions or just keeping an eye out for one of the many golden retrievers romping around campus, do what you can to pet a pup.

3. Keep a schedule. Schedule out everything you have to get done for the day including your meals. This will not only enable you to spend time more intentionally which relieves stress, but it will also give you an idea of when you should plan to de-stress.

4. Be honest. None of your meticulous scheduling matters if you weren’t honest with how you laid everything out. Be honest with yourself about what you can and can’t get done in a given amount of time. Running out of time for things will only increase your load, so start early and honestly.

5. Exercise. Do what works for you. Even something as small as taking a 15-minute break to stretch can give you energy, increase your mood and improve your ability to sleep, all of which help motivate you to be an academic weapon.

6. Be disciplined with your sleep schedule. Rolling up to your final with little to no sleep and a redbull shouldn’t be your top choice. Waking up well-rested will make it easier to get out of bed and stay motivated throughout the day.

7. Keep a positive attitude. It’s going to be so much harder to get something done or even to get motivated if you are telling yourself that you can’t do it the whole way.


Alexis Taylor is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at alexis.taylor@uconn.edu.