Dunkin announces it will stop using Styrofoam

This change will keep nearly one billion Styrofoam cups out of the global waste stream annually, according to the press release. (Charlotte Lao/The Daily Campus)

Dunkin Donuts announced recently they will completely stop using Styrofoam cups by 2020.

“With more than 9,000 Dunkin’ Donuts restaurants in the U.S. alone, our decision to eliminate foam cups is significant for both our brand and our industry,” Karen Raskopf, Chief Communications and Sustainability Officer for Dunkin’ Brands said in a press release.

The new double-walled paper cups will keep beverages just as hot at the traditional Styrofoam cups according to the press release. Dunkin said it will begin implementing the change this spring.

This change will keep nearly one billion Styrofoam cups out of the global waste stream annually, according to the press release.

Justin Kaiser, UConn PIRG’s Zero Waste Campaign Coordinator and former Stop Styrofoam Campaign Coordinator said he was happy to hear about this development.

“That was incredible news,” Kaiser said. “We at UConn PIRG are really really excited that Dunkin is becoming a leader in this initiative.”

Kaiser said he hopes Dunkin’s move will inspire other companies to follow suit.

“We’re hoping that leads to other companies…to really follow Dunkin’s lead and switch to more environmentally friendly materials than (Styrofoam),” he said.  

Last semester, Kaiser ran a campaign to work with the Dunkins around campus to stop using Styrofoam cups.

Kaiser said the company’s new announcement has dramatically shifted the direction of the campaign but that PIRG will continue to work with the university and local food businesses on other aspects of sustainability.

“Our goal now is to work with UConn and…potentially (businesses) around campus to make more environmentally friendly means of distributing their food and beverages,” he said.

Kaiser said PIRG is now looking to promote the use of reusable cups.

“At the end of the day, however environmentally friendly a cup can be, it’s always ideal to use your own, to reduce,” he said.


Anna Zarra Aldrich is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at anna.aldrich@uconn.edu. She tweets @ZarraAnna.