Weekly Wellness: Building yourself and your circle

Time and time again, we are told that happiness comes from within. We cannot rely on others to make us feel confident, secure or important. While this is true, it’s no secret that the people we surround ourselves with can truly affect our well-being. (File Photo/The Daily Campus)

Time and time again, we are told that happiness comes from within. We cannot rely on others to make us feel confident, secure or important. While this is true, it’s no secret that the people we surround ourselves with can truly affect our well-being.

College is already a stressful time because of the workload and the fact that we’re all out here living on our own, managing ourselves financially and physically. But the social scene adds a lot of extra tension and anxiety. Unfortunately, some of my experiences with people of our generation have been rather disappointing. That’s not to say everyone is like some of the “friends” I’ve had or people I’ve experienced, but there is something deeply concerning about how we treat each other nowadays.

Everyone in the world has their own vibe or aura. A vibe is defined on Google as “a person’s emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated to and felt by others.” We, as humans, have a natural intuition which allows us to feel people’s vibes upon meeting them and making a general assumption of judgement of their overall character.

Unfortunately, sometimes vibes can be deceiving. It is our job in today’s incredibly shallow and emotionally draining society to selfishly pick and choose who we allow into our lives. A toxic person will most likely not come across as toxic until weeks or months after you’ve given them your time and opened up to them, sharing things you might not have shared with anyone else. The feeling of betrayal from people you used to call friends can be devastating, so it is SO important that we become aware of our social surroundings.

The key to preserving yourself (which is to say, your happiness, your character and your values) is to work on yourself. If you have a passion or hobby, WORK AT IT. Utilize your natural talents and your internal drive to succeed in what you’re passionate about. This concept is usually thrown around very casually, but it holds so much importance; we need to do things for ourselves. Develop a daily routine. Take care of your skin, nourish your body with good food and stay hydrated. I know this all sounds frivolous, but I can promise you all that manifesting your desires through investing in yourself can be life changing.

Once you’ve developed confidence, security and happiness in yourself and your own life, the actions, words or motives of people around you will become less and less significant. There comes a point where we must realize that we have no control over other’s actions and sometimes, we will not understand why someone did what they did. The peace we have within ourselves is much more valuable than the destructive and hurtful actions of those around us.

This concept is directly applied to the college lifestyle, because we are all part of friend groups, we all probably have some drama going on and we all have probably gotten upset about something someone else did or said before. Depending on the seriousness of the situation, other’s actions can really break us down. The key is to remember that you are within your own body, in control of your own mind and know your own truth. Be at peace with yourself, release nothing but positive energy into the world and it will come back to you. Even if not right away, the energy you put out will come back to greet you.

I’m a firm believer in the universe constantly being at work. If we stand back and really look at things, any drama we have going on in our lives is hopelessly insignificant. It’s not difficult at all to be genuine. It’s not difficult to be kind and supportive, especially once you’ve achieved confidence and security within yourself. Most of the time, the reason people are rude or mean to others is because they’re insecure with themselves. It’s 2018; bringing people down is NOT the move. I think the goal for our generation is to love ourselves and each other, which sounds broad, but is extremely crucial. Time goes by so quickly; we should be spending it in a healthy and mature way.


Tessa Pawlik is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at tessa.pawlik@uconn.edu.