Four Arrows applications now open

 Four Arrows is seeking applicants for the role of Four Arrows Facilitator, which would be responsible for “providing facilitation for the ropes challenge courses, team building programs, hiking experiences, land navigation, and other experiential programming,” according to the position’s description. (Four Arrows Facebook page)

Four Arrows is seeking applicants for the role of Four Arrows Facilitator, which would be responsible for “providing facilitation for the ropes challenge courses, team building programs, hiking experiences, land navigation, and other experiential programming,” according to the position’s description. (Four Arrows Facebook page)

Applications for the University of Connecticut’s Four Arrows program are open until March 7, according to the program’s website. Four Arrows’ coordinator Mark Flynn said that the position involes training and a supportive environment for new members.

“Four Arrows will provide the necessary development of any new staff member in order for them to be successful in the role,” Flynn said.

Four Arrows is seeking applicants for the role of Four Arrows Facilitator, which would be responsible for “providing facilitation for the ropes challenge courses, team building programs, hiking experiences, land navigation, and other experiential programming,” according to the position’s description.

The position would require between five and 15 hours a week at $11.50, with $13.45 per hour work study/student labor, according to the position’s description.

Flynn said that it is also beneficial for applicants to enjoy working with groups and being outdoors. The ideal applicant should be, “self-motivated, willing to take initiative and [have] an open mind for learning,” Flynn said.

“We also value diversity and accessibility, therefore nobody applying should be concerned about previous skills on ropes courses or running experiential programs,” Flynn said.

The application process involves a group and individual interview process following applications and multiple trainings once the position has been accepted, according to the website.

Flynn encourages those seeking an outdoors job with a diverse UConn community to apply.

“If we develop strong staff members, then our programs will continue to provide value to those who participate in our experiences,” Flynn said. “If you are hired, you will gain or grow an abundant amount of transferable skills that no matter the industry you enter post-graduation will assist with making you stand out as a fantastic candidate.”

Flynn said one of the goals of the Four Arrows programs is to create an environment in which participants are forced to remain present, engaging with one another and working to form solutions to problems by working together. Four Arrows can be effective in any setting or with any sized group, Flynn added.

“Any and all groups [are recommended to book a Four Arrows program], but especially the ones who have yet to experience one of our programs,” Flynn said. “Let us come to you for an hour or a little more and we can give you a taste of team building. All of our programs are planned based on the specific group, their goals and possible limitations.”

Flynn emphasized that one of the most beneficial aspects of a Four Arrows program is getting to disconnect from technology and challenging individuals to step outside of their comfort zones, creating stronger bonds and forcing them to grow together as a group.

“The alumni and current staff would all use the word ‘family’ to describe our group and this showcases the types of connections made from being a part of Four Arrows,” Flynn said.


Abby Brone is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at abigail.brone@uconn.edu.