Super Bowl LII ads steered clear of politics

 This photo provided by Budweiser shows a scene from the company's Super Bowl spot. It was the most effective commercial in which one of the company’s factories repurposed their cans, filled them with water and sent them to those in need of disaster relief. (Budweiser via AP)

This photo provided by Budweiser shows a scene from the company's Super Bowl spot. It was the most effective commercial in which one of the company’s factories repurposed their cans, filled them with water and sent them to those in need of disaster relief. (Budweiser via AP)

As the 52nd Super Bowl dawned, so too did the legendary commercials that pepper our Facebook feeds in the days following the big game.

If you’re anything like me, the only reason you partook in the Super Bowl festivities was for the football-themed desserts and the legendary ads. Each Super Bowl is known for its often funny and occasionally controversial commercials between plays.

Many people know the hilarity of Doritos commercials and the endearing Clydesdales that Budweiser showcases each year, but some commercials go down in infamy for their ridiculousness. Here to sort through the mess for you, I present the 2018 Super Bowl’s most noteworthy commercials.

The most effective commercial was Budweiser’s “Stand By Me,” in which one of the company’s factories repurposed their cans, filled them with water and send them to those in need of disaster relief.

Ram takes the least effective ad, exploiting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s words for the purpose of their “Built to serve” motto. While occasionally embellishing a car or beverage commercial with meaningful scenes and sentiments works, raises goosebumps and sometimes tears, this was not one of those instances. The discomfort it brought was on par with Pepsi’s notorious Kendall Jenner ad from 2017.

Ads that feature celebrities are always memorable, and this year’s celebrity lineup included Cardi B, Peter Dinklage, Morgan Freeman and Cindy Crawford.

The premise of Amazon’s commercial centered around Alexa losing her voice and having various celebrities filling in with their own commentary. Tide aired a series of commercials mimicking other famous commercials that incite laughter.

Pringles aired an ad that featured Bill Hader and promoted the idea of stacking different Pringles flavors. The NFL supplied their own comedic advertisement in which Eli Manning and Odell Beckham Jr. re-enacted moves from the 80s classic “Dirty Dancing.”

While the general tone of the ads was less political than it has been in recent years, there were noticeably less misogynistic ads. Previously, gender stereotypes often infiltrated advertisements in the form of the idea that football is distinctly male-dominated. The most blatant example of this gender conformity was in a Doritos commercial a few years ago.

As a man sat on a plane waiting for takeoff, he hoped for an ideal seatmate. When an attractive woman came walking down the aisle, he readily held up a bag of Doritos and smiled at her. However, when the woman turned, it was revealed she was holding a baby, and the man’s face fell.

Ads such as these would seem out of place during the #MeToo movement and a time centered on on empowering women.

The general tone of the commercials this season chose one of two methods: tear jerking into the audience’s wallet or evoking laughter as a means of convincing the viewers to purchase their product.

Overall, the advertisements were admittedly not as entertaining as last year, but were a reasonably interesting interruption during the Justin Timberlake concert.   


Abby Brone is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at abigail.brone@uconn.edu.