Beanery now serving nitro and cold brew coffee

Dining Services is currently only leasing the new machine as a test run. If the new coffees prove to be popular Haggerty said they will consider bringing it to the other cafes like Up and Atom’s and Chem Café. (Eric Wang/The Daily Campus)

The Beanery café began serving nitro and cold brew coffee last week.

“(The nitro coffee) has the sweet, creamy texture of a Guinness,” University of Connecticut Dining Services Retail Operations Manager Ethan Haggerty said. “The idea behind it is the nitrogen is pushing oxygen out so it’s not going to get as bitter. It’s an interesting process.”

Cold brew coffee is prepared by brewing the coffee with cold water for 12 hours which makes it less acidic and less bitter. Nitro brew coffee is made by pumping nitrogen into cold brew coffee creating a layer of foam at the top of the drink.  

Haggerty said the cold brew coffee can also be enjoyed hot by warming it up without sacrificing the flavor of the coffee.

“If you left hot coffee on the counter for two hours… (it) would probably taste awful after two hours whereas (the cold brew) probably would not,” Haggerty said.

Last week and this week, the nitro and cold brew coffees were sold for $2.25, the price of a regular cup of iced coffee, but it will be increasing to its regular price of $3.25 next week for a 12 ounce cup.

“We wanted to give people the option to try this instead of their normal iced coffee, just to encourage people to try something new,” Haggerty said.

Union Street Market and Bookworms Cafe both serve cold brew coffee currently, but it is a very space-consuming process involving large buckets which must be constantly brewing Haggerty said, a process most cafes do not have the space for.

The new machine in the Beanery works off a concentrate of Peruvian coffee which is then mixed with water and nitrogen to make a drinkable cup of coffee. The machine is relatively small and fits neatly on the countertop at the Beanery.

“The main thing for me was to save space and be able to provide customers the option,” Haggerty said.

Haggerty said the nitro coffee has been more popular than the cold brew thus far. He said he Dining Services has been receiving positive feedback about the  nitro coffee but no positive or negative feedback on the cold brew yet.

These coffees are served in smaller portions than regular iced coffee because the cold brew coffee is much more caffeinated, Haggerty said. Cold brew coffee can have up to three times as much caffeine as a standard cup of hot coffee. According to the L.A. Times, Stumptown's 10.5-fluid-ounce bottle contains 279 milligrams of caffeine, and its 11-ounce nitro cold brew bottle contains 330 milligrams while an average eight-ounce cup of coffee only contains between 95 to 165 milligrams of caffeine.

Dining Services is currently only leasing the new machine as a test run. If the new coffees prove to be popular Haggerty said they will consider bringing it to the other cafes like Up and Atom’s and Chem Café.

“Anything that goes well we try to put in more spaces,” Haggerty said.


Anna Zarra Aldrich is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at anna.aldrich@uconn.edu. She tweets @ZarraAnna.