Composting workshop to be held March 31

In addition to the composting workshop, Mansfield has several incentives for residents to produce less waste, such as lower trash pick-up costs for recycling more, according to the town’s website. (Flickr Creative Commons/Joi Ito)

The Garden Gate Club and the Town of Mansfield will hold a backyard composting workshop on March 31 to help those interested in expanding or starting a compost pile.

The workshop will take place at the Mansfield Public Library’s Buchanan Auditorium from 10 to 11:30 a.m., Virginia Walton, recycling coordinator for the Town of Mansfield, said.

The presentation will show how a compost pile lowers the amount of household waste thrown out, Walton said.

“The presentation will help residents improve or help them start to reduce the amount of waste that they are putting in the trash... (The waste) will be turned into soil (if composted),” Walton said. “There are 100 common household items that can be used (in compost piles).”

Walton said compost piles are important because they help make soil healthier.

“You are taking the nutrients from food scraps, leaves, grass clippings, converting through a natural process that is easier for a plant to take up (nutrients),” Walton said. “(Composting) helps fertilize and promote microorganisms for healthy soil.”

Walton said that for college students, she advises being environmentally conscientious when purchasing food instead of creating a compost pile for recycling.

Walton said she would like students living in the dorms to know that the dates on packaged food are the advised day for the production company to sell the item by, not the day the food expires and is no longer edible. 

Walton said for those in an apartment, meal planning can help curb waste.

“If living in an apartment, shop for what you are going to eat for the week,” Walton said. “To prevent food waste, shop realistic for the week. If you aren’t going to eat it, don’t buy it.”


In addition to the composting workshop, Mansfield has several incentives for residents to produce less waste, such as lower trash pick-up costs for recycling more, according to the town’s website. Another incentive is smart shopping, which is going to the grocery store with a specific list and buying loose fruit and vegetables over pre-packaged items.


Rachel Philipson is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rachel.philipson@uconn.edu.