How to stop being single and get ready to mingle

 The beginning of a new semester means that everyone in your classes and your residence hall know as few people around them as you do, and are just as eager as you to change that. (Jamie/Flickr Creative Commons)

The beginning of a new semester means that everyone in your classes and your residence hall know as few people around them as you do, and are just as eager as you to change that. (Jamie/Flickr Creative Commons)

The beginning of a new semester means that everyone in your classes and your residence hall know as few people around them as you do, and are just as eager as you to change that. So if you’re single and really want to try a new relationship on for size, now’s the time to get moving. Here’s ten easy steps to flirt with someone new:

Sit near, ideally next to or behind, the person you hope to get to know better. Proximity is key so that the first hello doesn’t come from you storming across the room at the end of class and creeping them out. Scan the room when you walk in and take a seat as if it’s just any other seat.

Say hello. You probably won’t have a lot of time before the teacher starts lecturing, so you don’t need to jump into a conversation right away. Just say a simple hello and introduce yourself. If they don’t respond with their own name, ask. It’s no big deal. This time at the beginning of class is important, but not altogether necessary. The goal of is for the person you like to feel obligated to say goodbye before they leave at the end of class instead of just walking out the door. It also makes them think about you for a minute.

At the end of class, walk out with them. Talk for a bit, but unless you actually need to go in the direction they’re going, don’t walk too far, or they might think it’s a little strange. You can always walk with them for a minute or so and then fake out and say a nearby building is your stop. If you’re shy and don’t know what to say, just ask the standard college questions, such as: “What’s your major,” “What classes are you taking” or “What building are you living in?” You can also make the standard college comments such as, “Ugh, this class is going to be so much work,” “I really need some coffee” or “That professor was so strange.” The conversation will be quick, but it will encourage them to talk to you again.

Talk to them more at the beginning of the following class. Make little comments when the professor or another student does something funny. Walk them out again.

Ask for their number or Snapchat, but come up with some sort of lie to get it so it doesn’t seem like you’re jumping the gun. A foolproof one you can use is, “Hey can I have your number? This homework is kind of confusing and I might need help.”

Actually ask them about the homework that night. It will be a really organic way to start a conversation with them.

Find a way to hang out with them that wouldn’t necessarily be considered a date, unless of course if they ask if it’s a date. The best way to do this is to ask to do an assignment or study together sometime, or grab food in the dining hall together since they don’t want to eat alone any more than you do.

If they haven’t brought up a significant other of some kind yet, it wouldn’t hurt to ask, or to check their Instagram or Facebook. In a non-creepy way of course.

Ask them to do something with you that is unrelated to food or homework, that you could do alone together.

Ask them out. Fingers crossed they say yes.


Rebecca Maher is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rebecca.maher@uconn.edu.