The Nude Party suits up to get serious

The Nude Party’s origins speak to the character and culture of the band. They started as a group of best friends and roommates playing house parties at their alma mater (thenudeparty.bandcamp.com)

Give six burnt-out, ex-frat boy, office slackers an instrument each. Add to this mixture a generous helping of light beer and grain alcohol. Garnish with a propensity for getting naked. Bake in the oven at 420-degrees for about 30 minutes or until thoroughly cooked. What results is not only shockingly good music, but also an unmistakably charming, carefree energy.

The Nude Party’s origins speak to the character and culture of the band. They started as a group of best friends and roommates playing house parties at their alma mater, Appalachian State University. Over time, they became known around campus for their lake house shenanigans, where they could be found on any given Saturday night. Drunk and often naked, they would pick up their instruments and assemble out on the back porch as an audience surrounded their crazed display of flesh and fast-paced jams. While the sheer spectacle may have drawn the crowd’s attention initially, they stuck around after realizing these guys weren’t half bad.

Later, per the suggestions and encouragements of friends, they started playing at local bars and clubs. It was at this time that they decided to call themselves The Nude Party as it was an easily recognizable moniker for any college kid in Boone, North Carolina – although they were required to wear clothes at these more professional venues.

Now in their mid-twenties, The Nude Party has turned their attention toward making music full-time under the tutelage of Black Lips drummer Oakley Munson. Their devotion and seriousness is evident by the fact that they actually live in Munson’s basement at his home in Livingston Manor, New York deep in the Catskill Mountains, free from the typical college-town distractions of Boone, North Carolina.

“The social isolation and freezing winters up here in New York have got us working harder than before, just to stay busy,” Patton Magee, lead singer, said in a recent interview.

Evidently, their hard work is paying off because on July 6, 2018, they released their debut self-titled album. While they are yet to receive attention from major companies, a few smaller magazines reviewed the album to critical praise. Not only did Munson provide the technical knowledge to help produce the album, he promoted the band through his connections in the music world via the Black Lips. The result has been a steady touring schedule and a slow increase in attention on various music apps.

That being said, the Nude Party is not getting the kind of audience they deserve. Their songs flow like a Kerouac novel – rambunctious, very stream-of-consciousness, finding beauty and melody in the disorder of loud garage rock. They pay homage to melodically-driven classic rock with nods to the twangy guitar licks of Lynyrd Skynyrd and the steady, marching rhythmic guitar reminiscent of the Rolling Stones. At the same time, they fall somewhere in the spectrum of the modern psychedelic revival trend we’ve seen in the last decade with bands like Tame Impala and Post Animal. Stylistically, they undoubtedly have some work to do, but they clearly display a group chemistry that you just can’t teach. The fact that they are best friends shows, especially in their live performances, which are known for their debauchery and high energy. Dedicated fans have noted that their studio albums don’t do the band justice; you have to see them live, provided you are not faint of heart.


Mitchell Clark is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at mitchell.clark@uconn.edu.