How to Stop Being Single and Get Ready to Mingle: Spring break hookups

There is actually science to hooking up. Certain people are more predisposed to having casual sex than others. People who struggle or struggled with mental health, especially when they were young adults or in their teens, are more likely to have one-night stands than people who do not or have not struggled with mental health. (Wonder Woman/Flickr Creative Commons)

Spring break is coming and so is the stereotypical “Girls Gone Wild” migration down to someplace hotter than the freezer that is Connecticut. And when it comes to spring break somewhere beach-filled like Florida, one-night stands are bound to happen. So how do you know if you’re the kind of person who can have a one-night stand without regretting it the next day, and how do you go about it?

There is actually science to hooking up. Certain people are more predisposed to having casual sex than others. People who struggle or struggled with mental health, especially when they were young adults or in their teens, are more likely to have one-night stands than people who do not or have not struggled with mental health. There is also a gene called DRD4, often associated with ADHD, which causes people to display promiscuous behavior at a higher categorical rate and have 50 percent more instances of sexual infidelity than those without it. In addition to this, certain physical appearances are correlated with higher rates of casual sex. Specifically women with traditionally attractive feminine faces or with hips at least .8 inches or more wider than average, and men with masculine features.

Statistically speaking, men tend to regret missed sexual opportunities while women regret engaging in casual sex. In the few cases where men regret having sex, it’s usually due to the somewhat lacking physical appearance of their partner. Women, on the other hand, feel shame and tend to put blame on themselves. In addition to that, 26 percent of men and 50 percent of women have negative feelings toward one-night stands. It’s likely that women are less likely to enjoy and feel satisfied from the experience compared to men because only 42 percent of women surveyed had an orgasm during their last hookup compared to 78 percent of men. So for the most part, if you’re a woman you may feel less inclined to get in bed with the next person you see.

If you do want to get the so-called “full spring break experience,” then here are a few steps to take with the sexy person you meet at a club or party. Make a bond with the person before you make a mad rush for the hotel room. Talk a little and get your flirt on! Build up to the big event by complimenting them, using your full range of body language and casually ask to talk somewhere in private so you don’t just have to have a quickie in the bathroom. You should also make sure your intentions are completely transparent and a condom is on hand so no one gets hurt. Keep your kinks in check and don’t escape as soon as it’s over; it’s important that your one-time partner doesn’t get weirded out or feel gypped about the experience. Sex isn’t ever just about you.

If you have any questions or need any dating advice, feel free to contact me at rebecca.l.maher@uconn.edu. I’m positive other people are facing the same romantic problems as you, and would love to hear an answer.


Rebecca Maher is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rebecca.l.maher@uconn.edu.