Ned Lamont

Lamont’s proposed sales tax expansions unfair to students and lower income residents

Lamont’s proposed sales tax expansions unfair to students and lower income residents

Governor Ned Lamont has recently called for taxing goods and services in Connecticut that have been exempt from sales tax, including college textbooks. This is not an ideal way to raise revenue for the state, and is frankly unfair to many people who are already struggling financially.

Column: Governor Lamont might just be worse than Dan Malloy

Column: Governor Lamont might just be worse than Dan Malloy

In 2011, less than one month into his first term, Gov. Malloy, with the help of his legislative cronies, delivered the largest tax increase in the history of the state. Four years later, Malloy raised taxes again in an effort to close the multi-billion dollar budget deficit his administration’s irresponsible spending perpetuated. In 2017, Malloy signed into law yet another tax increase, ultimately leaving behind a $260 million deficit to secure his legacy as the Nutmeg State’s most prominent dolt.

Editorial: Raising smoking ages will help protect teens

Editorial: Raising smoking ages will help protect teens

One of the social changes Lamont proposed is raising the age for purchasing tobacco and vaping products to 21. While many have come out in support of this move in regard to traditional cigarettes, whose dangerous health risks are extremely well-documented, opinions over raising the vaping age have been more mixed.

Presidential search narrows, finalists meet with Lamont

Presidential search narrows, finalists meet with Lamont

Gov. Ned Lamont recently met with University of Connecticut presidential search committee chair Thomas Kruger and two finalists for the school’s next president, as the committee narrows its list of potential candidates.

Lamont is clearly the better choice for Connecticut

Lamont is clearly the better choice for Connecticut

With overwhelmingly unpopular Dannel Malloy (D) leaving office the Republican Party has a real shot to win back the Governor’s mansion for the first time in eight years. The two major party candidates vying to replace Malloy are Democrat Ned Lamont and Republican Bob Stefanowski. The candidates have vastly different ideas on how to fix the problems Connecticut faces and the values we should hold as a state.

Letter to the Editor: Re: "Lamont is a labor union lapdog, and this should concern you"

To the Editor of the Daily Campus,

Jacob Marie’s opinion piece (Oct 29), smearing both unions and gubernatorial nominee Ned Lamont as “a labor union lapdog”, is both misleading and misinformed. Marie blames Connecticut’s fiscal problems on an “unholy marriage” between labor and the Democratic Party while failing to identify himself as Director of Political Engagement for the UConn College Republicans. Nor does he reveal that his “facts” come from the anti-union, libertarian Yankee Institute. Marie says unions have “poured huge amounts of money” into Lamont’s campaign, but he ignores the far greater amount the Republican Governor’s Association (with unlimited corporate donations) is spending for Lamont’s opponent.

To their credit, Democrats like Lamont understand that unions, though collective bargaining, built the American middle class and are essential for preserving it. And that – not some phony conspiracy or imagined corruption – is the reason union members tend to vote Democratic.

Let’s set the record straight. First, Connecticut’s fiscal woes don’t stem from “unsustainable salaries and benefits given to state employees”. The real problem is debt. For decades, Connecticut promised retirement benefits to public employees without saving a dime to cover them; when it finally did start saving, it raided the pension fund. The result is a legacy of $100 billion in unfunded pension obligations. The current cost of benefits has nothing to do with it.

Marie also fails to explain that state employees have, through collective bargaining, bailed Connecticut out of three budget crises since 2008. Concessions negotiated in 2017 will save Connecticut $1.57 billion in the current biennium alone and $25 billion over 20 years. In the current biennium, state employees on average gave up $30,000 each. Yet Marie calls the 2017 agreement “irresponsible”.

Third, Marie’s claim that “state employees make anywhere from $25,000 to $40,000 more than their private sector counterparts” is false or seriously misleading. If we’re talking salaries, then it’s just false; private sector salaries are higher, especially for employees with advanced degrees. State jobs do tend to come with better benefits, but that difference has narrowed as state benefits have been “leveled down” (through negotiations).

The real issue isn’t whether public sector benefits are too high; its whether private sector benefits are too low. Big corporations, eager to please shareholders, have been reducing benefits for years; many small employers offer none at all. Jobs that used to provide excellent benefits no longer do, and the reason is that corporations have nearly destroyed collective bargaining.

Sincerely,

Thomas Bontly

President, UConn-AAUP,

Michael Bailey,

Executive Director, UConn-AAUP

UConn shows most support for Lamont, some support for Stefanowski and Griebel

UConn shows most support for Lamont, some support for Stefanowski and Griebel

With only four days before the election, University of Connecticut student support for Gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont (D) is high. His opponents, Bob Stefanowski (R) and Oz Griebel (I) rank low and close, according to a poll conducted by the Daily Campus.

Editorial: Connecticut’s fourth gubernatorial debate fuels an already-competitive race

Editorial: Connecticut’s fourth gubernatorial debate fuels an already-competitive race

On Sept. 26, the Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts hosted Connecticut’s fourth gubernatorial debate of the six scheduled before Nov. 6 midterm elections. The University of Connecticut and WFSB sponsored an informative hour-long discourse among Ned Lamont (D), Bob Stefanowski (R), and Oz Griebel (I), moderated by Daily Campus editor-in-chief Chris Hanna.

Lamont’s tax plan aimed at helping middle class families, imposing tolls on ‘heavy trucks’

Lamont’s tax plan aimed at helping middle class families, imposing tolls on ‘heavy trucks’

State of Connecticut Democratic nominee for governor Ned Lamont plans to reinstate the property tax credit that was eliminated under the Malloy administration, as well as reintroduce tolls to Connecticut roadways, according to the Lamont campaign website (reducing-property-taxes-for-middle-class).