Editorial: UConn students represent bright future in testimonies in Hartford

Editorial: UConn students represent bright future in testimonies in Hartford

UConn students and faculty spent time testifying members of the Appropriations Committee of the Connecticut General Assembly to advocate for the budget of the University of Connecticut for the upcoming fiscal year.

Column: There is no such thing as an upward redistribution of wealth

Column: There is no such thing as an upward redistribution of wealth

The first thing that needs to be understood is that no country has ever taxed itself into prosperity. While the levying of taxes is necessary in order for a government to fulfill its most basic responsibilities, the left has long sought to bleed America’s top earners into oblivion.

Reading contracts hinders companies from exploiting their clients.

Reading contracts hinders companies from exploiting their clients.

Recently, a woman in Georgia obtained $10,000 for reading a contract for travelling insurance. The woman in question found a clause that entitled people who read it and emailed the company providing the insurance would be paid $10,000.  This contrasts with companies who slip indentured servitude or soul purchase clauses in their contracts.

Children of anti-vaxxers deserve a choice

Children of anti-vaxxers deserve a choice

Last month, Ethan Lindenberger, a teenager from Ohio, made headlines for defying his mother’s wishes by becoming vaccinated against diseases like HPV, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and influenza for the first time at 18 years old. Lindenberger, one of seven children in his family, was not allowed to get vaccinated as a child due to his mother’s belief that vaccinations are harmful. However, when he turned 18 and became allowed to make decisions regarding his health and medical treatment for himself, Lindenberger decided to do research and take action, gaining support from others online.

Opinion: New party drug derivative has the potential to treat depression

Opinion: New party drug derivative has the potential to treat depression

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of a new antidepressant, esketamine, which has the potential to reduce depressive symptoms mere hours after administration. While this may sound like a near-miraculous treatment, the administration of esketamine is controversial.

Michael Cohen (among others) proves that simplicity isn’t always a virtue

Michael Cohen (among others) proves that simplicity isn’t always a virtue

On Feb. 27 Michael Cohen, President Trump’s former lawyer and “fixer” as the media has so flatteringly labeled him, testified before the House oversight committee. Cohen began by describing his former client as “a racist,” “a conman” and “a cheat,” degrading terms which have undoubtedly become staples of the discourse in which politicians, news commentators and even average citizens engage. As Cohen later outlined Trump and his campaign’s shady tactics prior to and throughout his tenure in office, even expressing regret for his role in such matters, several witnesses championed Cohen as an almighty hero. Although I appreciate Cohen’s open testimony and believe that Trump is guilty of legal and humane injustice, I’d like to testify that perhaps we shouldn’t oversimplify one’s true character or motives.

Editorial: Stamford Campus expanding as student population grows

Editorial: Stamford Campus expanding as student population grows

The UConn Stamford Campus has experienced an influx of students over the past several years, forcing the Board of Trustees to seek means of expansion in order to accommodate the newcomers. If Stamford is any indication, UConn could be taking over the state in the near future one city at a time.

'Gene drive' technology may help eradicate malaria

'Gene drive' technology may help eradicate malaria

Malaria is the most devastating disease humanity has ever seen. Caused by the parasite plasmodium, it is transferred to humans through a certain species of mosquito. The disease has existed for the entirety of recorded human history. Through medicine and pest management techniques, we have made some headway in reducing its rampage. However, in 2015, it still killed 435,000 people. We need a technological breakthrough to extinguish the danger.

CA high speed-rail: A case of how American individualism hinders public transportation

CA high speed-rail: A case of how American individualism hinders public transportation

The California high-speed rail project, the only one of its kind in the United States, recently made headlines after the federal government halted funding for the project. The actions of the American government are in deep contrast with the governments of nations such as China, where extensive high-speed rail projects are the norm. Even Kenya (with Chinese financing) built a new high-speed train to connect its largest cities, Mombasa and Nairobi, in a trip that lasts four and a half hours. The equivalent trip in the United States would be from Boston to Washington D.C., and it currently takes seven hours to complete by train or by car.

Cervical research could reduce the incidence of preterm labor

Cervical research could reduce the incidence of preterm labor

Since the beginning of science, doctors and researchers have been trying to discover as much as possible about the human body, and many groundbreaking advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. However, while scientists have sequenced the entire human genome, created targeted cancer therapies and developed a vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), they have not yet unraveled the question of how human beings are born. The science surrounding the initiation and mechanisms of labor remains unknown. Research dedicated to investigating this phenomenon is essential, since few solutions exist for problems such as preterm labor.