So you went trick or treating, what now?

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Now that Halloween is over, you probably have an overwhelming amount of candy. Instead of tossing them in the trash or making yourself sick by binging all in one go, think about donating unwanted candy to Operation Gratitude.  Photo by    Taylor Rooney    on    Unsplash

Now that Halloween is over, you probably have an overwhelming amount of candy. Instead of tossing them in the trash or making yourself sick by binging all in one go, think about donating unwanted candy to Operation Gratitude. Photo by Taylor Rooney on Unsplash

So you went trick or treating and got a ton of candy, or maybe you bought a huge bag of discount Halloween candy from the local CVS. What do you do with it all now that Halloween is over? 

The obvious route is to simply eat it, but it can be hard to practice self-control to make it last until Christmas. Instead, most people either binge it all in one go and end up feeling sick or dump it in the trash to protect their figure. Luckily, there are lots of ways to get rid of or use your candy in a way that won’t end in a trash bag or your stomach. 

While food banks prefer nutritious foods, there are plenty of places for you to donate your unwanted candy. Operation Gratitude sends care packages that include a handful of candy to soldiers to help put a smile on their faces in light of their difficult jobs. Their website’s Halloween Candy Give-Back initiative welcomes candy to be shipped to their facilities, with guidelines at. Halloween candy buy-backs, often featured at dentist offices, will buy back your candy in exchange for things like coupons, toothbrushes or even cash. Buy-back locations can be found on the website. You can also give candy to Ronald McDonald House Charities, with locations on https://www.rmhc.org, which give candy to severely ill children and their families.  

If you’d rather share your candy with those around you, there are plenty of baked goods that can easily incorporate your surplus candy. By chopping up chocolate-based candies like Snickers, Twix, Hershey’s or M&Ms, you can replace chocolate chips in any chocolate chip cookie or pancake recipe. This is especially tasty in homemade cookie cakes. Some people also enjoy incorporating non-chocolate candies like Skittles into cookies and as toppings on cakes, kind of like a Halloween twist on a Christmas fruit cake. Any post-Halloween party can be improved by delicious Halloween candy treats, even though the spooky holiday is over. 

Candies can also be used as an incentive for games. Maybe you and your friends could play poker with candy instead of cash, especially considering we’re all fairly broke college students. Or you could hide your friend’s candy and make them go on a convoluted scavenger hunt for it around campus. It can also be used as a sort of preparation for winter as a great replacement for snowballs! Your roommate can’t get mad at you for pelting them with fun-sized candy. It’s painful yet delicious! 

Worse case scenario, you can ship your candy to one of your child relatives. It would probably make their November. 

So if you’re a candy hater, a candy binger or if you just want to have a bit of fun with your candy horde, don’t worry! There are tons of fun, creative ways to get rid of your candy stockpile, and you can keep the trick or treating going throughout November. 


Rebecca Maher is a senior staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rebecca.l.maher@uconn.edu.

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