In Case You Missed It: What happened this week beyond UConn 

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Benji Peck, left, and Austin Grove remove a refrigerator from a damaged home Wednesday, March 4, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. Residents and businesses face a huge cleanup effort after tornadoes hit the state Tuesday.  Photo courtesy of Mark Humphrey / AP Photo

Benji Peck, left, and Austin Grove remove a refrigerator from a damaged home Wednesday, March 4, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. Residents and businesses face a huge cleanup effort after tornadoes hit the state Tuesday. Photo courtesy of Mark Humphrey / AP Photo

Nashville Tornado 

At least 24 people are dead, including several children, and an unspecified number of others are still missing after an EF-3 tornado ripped through Nashville and several other parts of the state of Tennessee in the early morning hours on Tuesday, according to CNN and the Associated Press. It is not clear the number of tornadoes total that wrecked havoc on a 145-mile stretch across the state. The tornadoes shredded more than 140 buildings and moved so quickly that a large number of the population did not have time to seek safety. Gov. Bill Lee declared a state of emergency, and the National Guard is currently assisting with search and rescue efforts. The White House announced the president had spoken with Gov. Lee and promised federal assistance in the cleanup efforts. Trump plans to visit the sites by Friday. 

 


Former Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg waves to supporters as he announces the suspension of his campaign and his endorsement of former Vice President Joe Biden for president in New York Wednesday , March 4, 2020.  Photo courtesy of Eduardo Munoz Alvarez / AP Photo.

Former Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg waves to supporters as he announces the suspension of his campaign and his endorsement of former Vice President Joe Biden for president in New York Wednesday , March 4, 2020. Photo courtesy of Eduardo Munoz Alvarez / AP Photo.

Michael Bloomberg Campaign Suspended 

Former mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg suspended his campaign for president on Wednesday morning, not long after Super Tuesday polls closed, according to the New York Times. He has since endorsed democratic candidate former Vice President Joe Biden for president. According to poll results, Bloomberg fell in third or worse in states he had hoped to win. His presidential bid, which started late, cost him more than half a billion dollars in advertising alone and millions more in various offices across the country staffed with paid campaign workers. His numbers, which were originally moderate, crashed after Elizabeth Warren questioned his conduct towards women in a fiery debate several weeks ago. 

 

James Bond Film Delay 

The newest James Bond film, “No Time To Die,” will have its release pushed from April to November due to increasing coronavirus concerns, according to BBC News. The producers said they made the decision after “careful consideration and thorough evaluation of the global theatrical marketplace.” It will now premiere in the United States on Nov. 25 as opposed to its planned April 3 release date. In an open letter, the founders of the James Bond Dossier wrote that having a large group of people together in rooms could open the possibility for several transmissions of the virus unknowingly, and such an event would be not be “the type of publicity anyone wants.” Several movie theaters have already closed in China and around the world over concerns about the virus, closing the second-biggest box office market for what is intended to be one of the biggest movies of the year.   

 


Vice President Mike Pence, center, joined at left by Dr. Deborah Birx, the coronavirus response coordinator, arrives at the Capitol to brief House members on the COVID-19 outbreak, in Washington, Wednesday, March 4, 2020. Congressional negotiators have reached agreement on an $8.3 billion bill to fund the government's response to the public health emergency.  Photo courtesy of J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo.

Vice President Mike Pence, center, joined at left by Dr. Deborah Birx, the coronavirus response coordinator, arrives at the Capitol to brief House members on the COVID-19 outbreak, in Washington, Wednesday, March 4, 2020. Congressional negotiators have reached agreement on an $8.3 billion bill to fund the government’s response to the public health emergency. Photo courtesy of J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo.

House Coronavirus Bill 

On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed an $8.3 billion spending bill focused on coronavirus prevention and treatment efforts, according to Fox News. The bill passed 415-2, and roughly triples the original $2.5 billion plan President Trump unveiled last week. The legislation is now on the Senate floor and is expected to be voted on on Thursday. More than $3 billion will be used for research and developing vaccines, an additional $2 billion to help federal, state and local governments prepare for and control the outbreak and several million dollars for medical supplies and other miscellaneous anticipated costs ahead of the virus’s anticipated spread throughout the United States. 

 

Arizona Transgender Athlete Bill 

The Arizona House of Representatives passed a bill that, if signed into law, would ban transgender female athletes from taking part in school sports, according to ABC News. Termed the “Save Women’s Sports Act,” it will require school-sponsored sports in the state to designate sports for girls and boys based on their biological sex. The bill passed along party lines in a vote of 31-29 after hours of emotional, heated debate. It would apply to K-12, community college and university sports teams if passed.   


Taylor Harton is the associate news editor for The Daily Campus. She can be reached by email at taylor.harton@uconn.edu.

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