9/11

The University of Connecticut remembers Sept. 11 

The University of Connecticut remembers Sept. 11 

If there is a single defining event for the United States in the 21st century, that event would be the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia. The attacks claimed the lives of 2,977 innocent people and injured over 6,000 others. It is almost impossible to properly measure the full impact of the attacks, as their repercussions have been felt throughout the world in the ensuing War on Terror and America’s change in foreign and domestic policy.

Letter to the Editor: Please Don’t Defend the Indefensible

As a UConn alumna whose graduate research concerns mass trauma, I was stunned and disappointed to read a Daily Campus Opinion article defending Rep. Ihlan Omar’s inexcusable rhetoric around 9/11. Cameron Cantelmo’s recent article was extraordinarily dismissive of the collective pain of victims, survivors, and witnesses of 9/11. 

That thing some people did that one time

That thing some people did that one time

Over the weekend, the political arena was lit ablaze yet again after word emerged that Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) made a ridiculously negligent statement last month during a speech. The thoughtlessness of these particular words was infraction enough, but far more petulant was Omar’s doubling down and the left’s willingness to defend her.

Speaking at a Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) banquet, Rep. Omar stated the following:

“For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.”