Citizenship

The census estimates the number of… citizens?

The census estimates the number of… citizens?

Every 10 years, the United States Census Bureau conducts a “census” which helps count the population of the United States. This population includes everyone living in the U.S. — citizens, legal residents who are not citizens, long term visitors who are not citizens as well as undocumented immigrants. Through this procedure, states are allotted a number of members of the House of Representatives depending on the total population of each state, with the total members of the House equaling 435. 

Census citizenship question is a short-sighted attack

Census citizenship question is a short-sighted attack

Many will be surprised to hear that there hasn’t been a citizenship question on the standard United States census since 1950. I certainly was; it seems like it would be a good idea to know how many citizens reside in the United States, right?

We must give representation to citizens no matter where they live

We must give representation to citizens no matter where they live

Voting rights have long been an issue in the United States. It has been a lengthy (often uphill), battle throughout the past couple of centuries to give all people in the country the right to vote. However, our method of giving a voice to all is still lacking in several areas; certain voter ID laws are used to disenfranchise voters and gerrymandering is used to essentially rig elections for politicians who draw the districts.