UConn Students

Students sell stickers in honor of ‘Soop Doop’ employee

Students sell stickers in honor of ‘Soop Doop’ employee

Business students at the University of Connecticut have teamed up to create and sell stickers of Luis Diaz, who is better known as the “Soop Doop Guy” who works in the Student Union, according to seventh-semester business management and turfgrass science double major Matt Ternullo.  

SET surveys allow students to give feedback on classes, professors

University of Connecticut students now have the ability to give feedback on their classes and professors through the Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) surveys. The surveys are due by Friday, Dec. 7, according to the SET Survey Fillout Task List.

The Student art exhibition showcases talent of UConn students

The fourth opening reception of the Student Art Exhibition took place on the second floor of the Wilbur Cross Library on September 5. The exhibition features work from undergraduate and graduate students.   Olivia Stenger / The Daily Campus

The fourth opening reception of the Student Art Exhibition took place on the second floor of the Wilbur Cross Library on September 5. The exhibition features work from undergraduate and graduate students.

Olivia Stenger / The Daily Campus

The Student Art Exhibition Opening Reception showcased art by undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Connecticut, Tuesday night in the Wilber Cross Building. Art pieces lined the hallways on the second floor of the building outside the Center for Career Development. The pieces covered a wide array of mediums, featuring paintings, sketches, photography, graphics and much more.

Pieces in the exhibition were presented alongside a brief description of the artist and a short excerpt explaining the piece to those in attendance. Much of the media presented showcased the thoughts and feelings of their respective artists. Several pieces depicted the artists’ struggle with anxiety, while others told a story about the artists’ lives.

While many of the photographs presented acted as a snapshot of the photographers’ lives, a majority featured nature and travel.

“I like that they have a lot of different kinds of art, and a lot of different ideas that they are trying to express all in one place,” Matthew Stojanov, a third-semester mechanical engineering major, said.

The pieces at the exhibition were created by a wide variety of majors at UConn. Interestingly, many of the featured pieces were created by non-art majors, a fact that was noticed by Megan Willison, a graduate student of anthropology.

“It’s cool to see the diversity of artistic talent in people that don’t necessarily follow an art focus,” Willison said.

This is the fourth semester that the Student Art Exhibition has taken place.

According to the Marketing and Communication Director for the Center for Career Development, Amanda Bradley, undergraduate and graduate students from all of UConn’s campuses are eligible to submit their work for the exhibition. Around 200 students send in their artwork to be featured each semester, but only about 40 are selected

“We select as many that we can fit in the space that we have,” Bradley said. “We try to select different ones every time, and they are always so fantastic.”

A panel of judges from the Center for Career Development and the School of Fine Arts decide which pieces will be featured in the next exhibition. Pieces for a new exhibition are chosen each semester, giving students plenty of time to have their art featured before they graduate.

Bridget Smith, a fifth-semester digital media and design major, had her piece “Gaze” featured in the exhibition. This semester’s exhibition marks the third time Smith’s artwork has been featured, but she said it is still exciting to hear that her piece has been selected.

“I still got just as excited as I have been in the past when I was notified that my work would be featured,” Smith said. “I know I worked hard on my piece and I'm happy that people will be able to see it and others' work for the rest of the semester.”

The Student Art Exhibition will remain on display in Wilbur Cross until the end of the semester.

Editorial: UConn must work to decrease auto part thefts

The UCPD has increased nighttime patrols in an effort to catch thieves in the act, but the number of parking lots and hours of darkness has lead to a problem that cannot be solved by sheer manpower alone. (File Photo / The Daily Campus)

UConn students have been hit by a second wave of auto part thefts. Earlier in March, there was a string of tire thefts that left students finding their vehicles useless in the morning. Investigations led by the UConn Police Department (UCPD) never led to arrests.

The ushering in of the new semester brought with it another string of thefts - this time, catalytic converters. So far, according to reports, five cars have had their converters stolen. Included in this lists are cars that were parked in the highly populated area between Snow, a building that is a part of South Campus Residence Halls, and Belden, a building that is a part of Alumni Residence Halls. The catalytic converter, a device that is used to decrease the toxicity of exhaust fumes, can cost up to $2000 to replace, depending on make and model. It can be accessed from underneath the car using a car jack, similarly to how car tires can be stolen.

The UCPD has put out a news release that contains helpful tips about vehicle safety, such as urging students to always lock their cars. While these are good tips in general, they do little to deter or prevent thieves from crawling underneath parked cars.

In addition, the UCPD has increased nighttime patrols in an effort to catch thieves in the act, but the number of parking lots and hours of darkness has lead to a problem that cannot be solved by sheer manpower alone.

UConn needs to implement measures such as increasing the number of security cameras being used to monitor parking lots to combat thefts. For the money students pay in parking passes, more is expected to ensure the safety of cars parked there. One parking pass, for example, for the spots between Snow and Belden costs $454. For that kind of money, students should expect more.

Catching auto part thieves retroactively is incredibly difficult and, as shown by last semester, is often deemed impossible. UConn must do more to ensure that thefts decrease, that criminals can be caught after the fact, and ensure students that their property will be protected from malicious activity.