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Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Celebrations in a Pandemic

On the morning of Saturday, Nov. 7, four days after the 2020 election, most major media outlets named Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. Following an incredibly stressful four days as Biden slowly made progress in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin as mail-in ballots were counted, the election was finally over.

Carson’s Commentary: AOC raises eyebrows with a proposal to ‘archive’ pro-Trump tweets

n case you missed it in the midst of last week’s election chaos, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.-14) found herself facing widespread condemnation for her actions on Twitter. Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman Democrat commonly known as “AOC”, tweeted the following on Friday, Nov. 6.

You should become politically involved

On Saturday after days of suspenseful ballot counting, spectators awarded Joe Biden victory in the 2020 presidential election.

Stop trying to unify our country.

As I am writing this, it is Thursday, and we do not yet have a president. Joe Biden is still leading Donald Trump, as he has been for most of this election. But delays in counting mail-in votes in five states has severely slowed the election process and left the country frozen, waiting for the moment of defeat or vindication that will come when one candidate or another is declared victor in what has probably been the most vicious political cycle in history.

Reality Check: The United States is not a democracy

Tuesday was the United States’ 59th presidential Election Day. We witnessed masses of citizens and politically motivated, armed security guards intimidating voters outside of polling locations. Claims of widespread voter suppression have been leveraged at the acting president. Voting locations became ideological and physical battlegrounds where different kinds of voters came into conflict with one another and even the police. The president and the supreme court are embroiled in a conflict over whether or not all ballots cast by mail should be accounted for in the election.

Stay Strong, UConn: We won’t know the election results tonight.

Election day. It's finally here. Amid increasing partisan tensions, during a pandemic, after four years of a contentious presidency, today is election day.

Candidates

Trump

While Trump campaign continues ballot validity battle, Biden transition team lays groundwork for upcoming administration

After the declaration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. as the 46th President of the United States on Saturday, the Trump campaign still has yet to concede as they file lawsuits in multiple battleground states. President Trump is currently working on new lawsuits to sue multiple states over various elements of the voting process and is asking for recounts.

Carson’s Commentary: AOC raises eyebrows with a proposal to ‘archive’ pro-Trump tweets

n case you missed it in the midst of last week’s election chaos, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.-14) found herself facing widespread condemnation for her actions on Twitter. Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman Democrat commonly known as “AOC”, tweeted the following on Friday, Nov. 6.

Election 2020 Weekend Breakdown: How Joe Biden reached 270 and what happens next

The 2020 Democratic candidate, Joseph Biden, won the presidential election after Pennsylvania gave him 20 electoral votes Saturday at 11:25 a.m. EST, according to The Associated Press.

UConn students react to the 2020 presidential election

Last week, University of Connecticut students reacted to President-elect Joe Biden’s win in the 2020 election with a variety of emotions, including both excitement and relief.

Biden

Don’t expect Kamala Harris to keep her promises

Maybe you’ve seen them on TikTok or maybe you’ve seen them on Instagram, but the Kamala Harris aesthetic edits need to stop. Let’s not forget that Democrats settled for the Biden-Harris administration for a reason: because anything was better than Donald Trump. Kamala Harris has had an extensive record of being inconsistent and just because she’s the first woman Vice President-elect does not mean that Americans should be turning a blind eye to her questionable past.

No, it’s not time to go back to brunch just yet

Following the aftermath of a tiresome election week, former Vice President Joe Biden was named the 46th president of the United States on Saturday, Nov. 7. Celebration of his victory has been amplified throughout the country, encouraging unified toasts, dancing in the streets and a sense of universal togetherness to commemorate the finale of a grueling presidential era. Despite the encouragement of cheers of joy, many abolitionists have taken the time to remind us that our noise should not turn white in the face of a “lesser evil.” Instead, we must continue to grow louder, smarter and more aggressive, as the work we have left to accomplish is far from over while authors of a corrupt society continue to be elected into office.

While Trump campaign continues ballot validity battle, Biden transition team lays groundwork for upcoming administration

After the declaration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. as the 46th President of the United States on Saturday, the Trump campaign still has yet to concede as they file lawsuits in multiple battleground states. President Trump is currently working on new lawsuits to sue multiple states over various elements of the voting process and is asking for recounts.

What to expect from Biden’s immigration policy

Many Americans are pleased that our next president appears to be more polite, kind and sensible than his predecessor, at least in public relations. Yet, it's critical that we are capable of acknowledging the nuance of political developments, including the extent to which new leadership can continue old policies and maintain previous political structures in spite of outward appearances.

Other Electables

Working Americans need a new political party

In the current 2020 Democratic presidential primary, the party is once again demonstrating that it cannot tolerate leadership or policies which represent or advocate for American workers.

The Democratic Establishment: Why Bernie and Trump don’t hate each other

Since he turned political nearly five years ago, Donald Trump’s Twitter attacks have given him an unprecedented amount of free media coverage. But in recent months, one man has found himself both immune from the president’s attacks and invisible in the mainstream media: Bernie Sanders.