26 F
Storrs
Monday, January 25, 2021

Celebrations in a Pandemic

On the morning of Saturday, Nov. 7, four days after the 2020 election, most major media outlets named Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. Following an incredibly stressful four days as Biden slowly made progress in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin as mail-in ballots were counted, the election was finally over.

Carson’s Commentary: AOC raises eyebrows with a proposal to ‘archive’ pro-Trump tweets

n case you missed it in the midst of last week’s election chaos, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.-14) found herself facing widespread condemnation for her actions on Twitter. Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman Democrat commonly known as “AOC”, tweeted the following on Friday, Nov. 6.

You should become politically involved

On Saturday after days of suspenseful ballot counting, spectators awarded Joe Biden victory in the 2020 presidential election.

Stop trying to unify our country.

As I am writing this, it is Thursday, and we do not yet have a president. Joe Biden is still leading Donald Trump, as he has been for most of this election. But delays in counting mail-in votes in five states has severely slowed the election process and left the country frozen, waiting for the moment of defeat or vindication that will come when one candidate or another is declared victor in what has probably been the most vicious political cycle in history.

Reality Check: The United States is not a democracy

Tuesday was the United States’ 59th presidential Election Day. We witnessed masses of citizens and politically motivated, armed security guards intimidating voters outside of polling locations. Claims of widespread voter suppression have been leveraged at the acting president. Voting locations became ideological and physical battlegrounds where different kinds of voters came into conflict with one another and even the police. The president and the supreme court are embroiled in a conflict over whether or not all ballots cast by mail should be accounted for in the election.

Stay Strong, UConn: We won’t know the election results tonight.

Election day. It's finally here. Amid increasing partisan tensions, during a pandemic, after four years of a contentious presidency, today is election day.

Candidates

Trump

Why we need to stop deifying Abraham Lincoln

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to deduce that America is an incredibly polarized nation right now. In a world where even simple facts have become incessantly debated, it seems that there is still one topic that politicians from both sides of the aisle agree on: Abraham Lincoln was a great president.

While Trump campaign continues ballot validity battle, Biden transition team lays groundwork for upcoming administration

After the declaration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. as the 46th President of the United States on Saturday, the Trump campaign still has yet to concede as they file lawsuits in multiple battleground states. President Trump is currently working on new lawsuits to sue multiple states over various elements of the voting process and is asking for recounts.

Carson’s Commentary: AOC raises eyebrows with a proposal to ‘archive’ pro-Trump tweets

n case you missed it in the midst of last week’s election chaos, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.-14) found herself facing widespread condemnation for her actions on Twitter. Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman Democrat commonly known as “AOC”, tweeted the following on Friday, Nov. 6.

Election 2020 Weekend Breakdown: How Joe Biden reached 270 and what happens next

The 2020 Democratic candidate, Joseph Biden, won the presidential election after Pennsylvania gave him 20 electoral votes Saturday at 11:25 a.m. EST, according to The Associated Press.

Biden

Biden administration begins tackling complex issues hours after inauguration

In his inaugural address Wednesday, President Joe Biden made a case for national unity while laying out the largest issues his administration will have to tackle. The coronavirus pandemic (and suffering economy), climate change, systematic racism and America’s hold on democracy, here and abroad, were the most pressing, according to the New York Times.

Joe Biden sworn in as the 46th President of the United States yesterday

In an unprecedented period in American history, Joseph R. Biden Jr. was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States yesterday, calling it a day of “history and hope.”

Carson’s Commentary: Biden hits the ground running with executive order proposals

As Saturday Night Live amusingly pointed out several years ago, President Barack Obama issued several powerful executive orders to push his agenda around a hostile Republican Congress. Today, President-elect Joe Biden — a direct witness to each of Obama’s 276 executive orders — takes his seat in the Oval Office.

Biden made a promise to deliver on immigration reform, but can he keep it?

As the Biden administration commences its four-year opportunity to deliver campaign promises this week, many Americans are optimistic about the prospects of immigration reform. In fact, President-elect Biden is poised to unveil a plan for an 8-year path to citizenship on his first day in office, alongside a growing list of executive orders and issues the administrations will tackle. Biden’s plans for immigration reform will soon cross paths with a new caravan of immigrants making its way from Central America to the U.S. southern border. In the meantime, the passage of immigration reform will follow a less certain path in a polarized Congress and it will only reach victory if it remains a priority for the Biden administration and if Democrats can garner bipartisan support.

Other Electables

Working Americans need a new political party

In the current 2020 Democratic presidential primary, the party is once again demonstrating that it cannot tolerate leadership or policies which represent or advocate for American workers.

The Democratic Establishment: Why Bernie and Trump don’t hate each other

Since he turned political nearly five years ago, Donald Trump’s Twitter attacks have given him an unprecedented amount of free media coverage. But in recent months, one man has found himself both immune from the president’s attacks and invisible in the mainstream media: Bernie Sanders.