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Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Big Brain Energy: Demystifying the “stress shits” and other psychological disorders of the gut

Picture this: You’re sitting in the chemistry building, desperately trying to study for a lab quiz for class in 30 minutes. Your heart is racing and your palms are sweaty. Suddenly, while spending the last few seconds you have cramming in any last bits of information into your overworked brain, you feel a dreadful nausea come over you. It starts in your stomach and gradually makes its way down to your groin. Shit, you think to yourself, as you run to the bathroom.

‘Legally and Medically Trans’ discussed transgender health and identity

On Tuesday, the Rainbow Center hosted a virtual discussion titled “Legally and Medically Trans,” providing information about the legal identity and medical process many transgender individuals go through.

‘Sarah Cooper: Everything’s Fine’ is an original brand of comedy

Between the global pandemic and the upcoming presidential election, the world is currently a very tense place. Sarah Cooper’s new Netflix comedy special, “Everything’s Fine,” cleverly captures this sense of impending doom we have become all too familiar with over the past year.

Voter suppression has a long history in the US

The United States was founded on the principle of equality and freedom, but many of the laws and policies that have been put in place by the government have and continue to uphold systematic inequality.

Get Toasted: @ The Laurel Diner

Over the weekend, I tried out a breakfast and lunch spot with my friends that has been on my list for awhile. The Laurel Diner is a small breakfast and lunch spot with plenty of variety.

A Zero Waste Project: A DIY dish soap

As I made up my grocery list this week, dish soap was at the top. But why, I asked myself, buy a normal plastic bottle of dish soap, when that will just run out in a month, sending me back to the store for another plastic bottle of dish soap? I figured this was a ready-made opportunity to try out the first in a line of homemade, zero waste, cleaning supply swaps.

‘Over the Moon’: An ‘ultraluminary’ tale through love and loss

Netflix’s latest original animated film, “Over the Moon,” shines bright with its all-Asian voice cast starring Phillipa Soo, John Cho, Ken Jeong, Sandra Oh and newcomer Cathy Ang.

Racial inequities in healthcare with Dr. Sunil D’Cunha

The discussion, which took place over WebEx, focused on the prevalence of racial injustices in today’s healthcare system and concentrated on federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), access to healthcare regarding homelessness and specific issues of inequity relating to COVID-19.

Have fun as an ‘Immortal Redneck’ with a shotgun

Developed and published by Crema Games, “Immortal Redneck” is a first-person shooter with rogue-lite mechanics where players assume the role of a redneck tourist who finds himself mummified in Egypt and must fight through the dangerous dungeons of the pyramids of Giza because he refuses to stay dead.

Undergraduate students present their research at the Fall Frontiers exhibition

On Monday night the University of Connecticut invited students to join the undergraduate research community for the Fall Frontiers exhibition. The exhibition gave undergraduate students the opportunity to present their research and final conclusions.

COVID-19 COVERAGE

The addictive quality of screens and why we’re hooked

Americans, on average, spend anywhere between 15 to 20 years of their life in front of a screen. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated this statistic as many individuals now find themselves forced to spend the majority of their day online for work or social purposes.

‘Totally Under Control’ offers frank look at handling of the COVID-19 pandemic

With an upcoming second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic to presumably hit this winter, documentary “Totally Under Control” was released on Hulu yesterday and gives a detailed look at what went on during the start of the pandemic through a scientific, political and economic lens.

Creating Art in COVID-19

While the COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges for all departments, the arts have been particularly affected by the outbreak with faculty and students having to abandon their traditional methods of instruction to accommodate the new virtual environment.

World Mental Health Day reminds us ‘It’s ok to not be ok’

This year, the day came at a time when many people’s lives have been upended by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the mental health of millions of people has endured negative effects.

The pandemic’s effects on the film industry

2021 is going to be absolutely packed with movies, which will lead to studios delaying many of their tentpole releases to 2022. While the pandemic will hopefully be solved by next year, its ramifications on the film industry will last for a long time.

Campus Events

Stay up-to-date with what's happening on campus

Racial inequities in healthcare with Dr. Sunil D’Cunha

The discussion, which took place over WebEx, focused on the prevalence of racial injustices in today’s healthcare system and concentrated on federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), access to healthcare regarding homelessness and specific issues of inequity relating to COVID-19.

Undergraduate students present their research at the Fall Frontiers exhibition

On Monday night the University of Connecticut invited students to join the undergraduate research community for the Fall Frontiers exhibition. The exhibition gave undergraduate students the opportunity to present their research and final conclusions.

How to stay safe and spooky this Halloweekend

In an effort to keep students on campus for Halloween, various campus organizations have banded together to host events for Halloweekend.

Movies & Television

Read our reviews of what has been premiering lately

‘Over the Moon’: An ‘ultraluminary’ tale through love and loss

Netflix’s latest original animated film, “Over the Moon,” shines bright with its all-Asian voice cast starring Phillipa Soo, John Cho, Ken Jeong, Sandra Oh and newcomer Cathy Ang.

‘Bad Hair’ is a tangled mess

Last Friday, the horror comedy film “Bad Hair” was released on digital streaming platform Hulu. Directed by Justin Simien of “Dear White People” renown, “Bad Hair” remains faithful to the horror genre just in time for Halloween, while also tackling the tangled mess that is hair texturism within the black community. While its social commentary shines through as somber yet comedic, the film is muddled by the plot’s shabby pacing and poor realization of its otherwise poignant themes.

‘My Next Guest Needs No Introduction’: New season discusses prison reform and BLM

After building his career as a talk show host over the course of 33 years, David Letterman has established himself as a household name. Three years following his retirement from “Late Show” in 2015, Letterman decided to embark on another project, one that caters toward streaming services rather than cable television. The first season of “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman” premiered on Netflix on Jan. 12, 2018 and has since gained positive reception for its unusual format and intuitive conversations, differing from the typical talk show routine. Two seasons later, “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction” released its third season Wednesday. Despite sudden COVID-19 restrictions risking the untimely halt of production, Letterman was still able to participate in engaging discussions with four guests, one for each episode.

Music

Coverage and reviews of your favorite albums, musicians, concerts and more

‘Visions of Bodies Being Burned’ is experimental hip-hop personified

The world of experimental hip-hop has been overlooked in favor of more mainstream-sounding music. Acts like Death Grips and JPEGMAFIA have been at the forefront of shaping rap music that is creative and innovative. One group that is often left out of the conversation of experimental hip-hop is clipping. Based in Los Angeles, clipping. consists of rapper Daveed Diggs and producers William Hutson and Jonathan Snipes. After listening to their latest album “Visions of Bodies Being Burned,” it is safe to say that clipping. produced one of the finest albums of the year.

Gorillaz deliver with ‘Strange Timez’

It seems only appropriate that a year as strange as 2020 would see the release of a new album from the off-beat British virtual band Gorillaz. Their seventh studio album, “Song Machine, Season One: Strange Timez,” is another great addition to their innovative, fun and weird discography.   

‘As Long As You Are’ shows Future Islands being absent

Few acts are bigger in the synthpop scene than Future Islands. This North Carolina-based band came on to the music scene in 2014 with their album “Singles.” Since then they have only grown in popularity. However, with their latest album “As Long As You Are,” the band seems to have gone ghost.

Features

UCTV allows students to make a variety of film content

Have you ever wanted to air on television? Do you like film, production or want to bring your creative ideas to life? UConn Student Television (UCTV) is a student-run television station that has been around since 1991, allowing students to have hands-on experience creating content that airs on HuskyVision Channel 14.

African American Cultural Center: Continued excellence despite troubling times

The African American Cultural Center (AACC) at UConn is closed this fall semester, but the organization is still keep busy during these troubling times.

Weekly Columns

Hollieats

Hollie Lao

This Week in History

Gino Giansanti

Big Brain Energy

Taylor Harton

A Zero Waste Project

Alex Houdeshell

Pop Cultured

Amy Chen

The Backlog

Brandon Barzola

Get Toasted

Olivia Hickey

Thirsty Thursdays

The Daily Campus Life Section

Must Read

UConn basketball is a ray of sunshine in our cloudy world

If you hold a basketball in your hands and look down on it from above, the seams which hold the leather together can look something like rays of sun emanating from the center of the ball. It is apt, then, that the UConn Basketball program, which has brought Connecticut students and residents so much joy over the years, is one small ray of sunshine in the face of the increasingly bleak world. As the pandemic continues to rage on in the United States and a third wave builds in Connecticut, UConn women’s and men’s basketball is back.

Tucker Carlson, Medicare and Hypocrisy: How Fox News is completely disconnected from its viewers

It’s a regular Monday night, I’m finishing up my work for the night and hitting the couch to watch the news for a bit. After a few minutes, the show I’m watching goes to commercials so I decide to flip to Fox News. I expect to find some form of misinformation or outrageous spin, and I find exactly that.

Big Brain Energy: The Problem with Autism Speaks

When neurotypical people think of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), they often think of organizations such as Autism Speaks, which is one of the most internationally recognized autism groups. However, as an organization, Autism Speaks remains one of the most hotly debated aspects of the autistic community, given the questionable actions of those who run the foundation and what it fundamentally stands for.

Mirror Lake sees weekly partying, President Katsouleas suggests students spend Halloweekend outside

This semester, Mirror Lake became one of the centers of weekend night-life on campus. With more COVID-19 related restrictions in the dorms, many students have been seen spending their Friday and Saturday nights frequenting the lake, listening to music, drinking and hanging out with friends, often with no masks and no social distancing. In an interview with The Daily Campus regarding safety concerns associated with frequent weekend parties at Mirror Lake, University of Connecticut President Thomas Katsouleas said that he encourages students this upcoming Halloween weekend to choose outdoor social gatherings, acknowledging the safety concerns of partying.

Hey Dave: Is Ansu Fati the heir to Lionel Messi?

Seeing young soccer players go through a club’s academy and end up playing for that same team always makes fans happy, as they can to see the young players’ careers flourish right before their eyes. Some iconic homegrown players include Marcus Rashford at Manchester United, Harry Kane at Tottenham and Lionel Messi over at Barcelona, to name a few.

Cultural Centers

Indigenous Peoples’ Week: A discussion on embracing Indigenous identity

During the past week, the University of Connecticut’s Native American Cultural Programs (NACP) held an event each weekday to honor Indigenous Peoples’ Week. Their last event took place on Friday, where Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) members shared their experiences being Indigenous at UConn. The end of Indigenous Peoples’ Week is by no means a presumption to discontinue the recognition of those who identify within Native or Indigenous populations. As part of the movement to educate others on the importance of this idea and to promote the continuation of these conversations, Friday’s discussion made a lasting impression on what it truly means to be Indigenous.

The Rainbow Center and LUL recognize BIPOC in LGBTQIA+ history

Thursday night was an eventful evening for the University of Connecticut Rainbow Center and the Beta Iota Chapter of La Unidad Latina (LUL), Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity, Inc. The organizations hosted an event titled “Masoquista: Lifting BIPOC Voices Throughout Queer History,” discussing major events in LGBTQIA+ history.

International Pronouns Day promotes a more inclusive society

International Pronouns Day is observed each year on the third Wednesday of October to raise awareness about the value of using preferred pronouns for individuals, especially those who identify as non-binary. This day was first celebrated in 2018 to shed light on the human dignity factor associated with referring to people by the pronouns that they have determined for themselves, instead of making assumptions about how a person may identify.

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