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Saturday, March 6, 2021

Math and the incommunicable marvelous

There are certain passages from books I’ve read that stay with me, and that later come to define certain moments or realizations. I imagine this is true for other people as well — a beautifully layered series of words somehow winds itself around your thoughts and stays there.

UConn exploring possibility of in-person commencement ceremonies

On Thursday, University of Connecticut President Thomas Katsouleas announced the possibility of in-person graduation ceremonies for the classes of 2020 and 2021, contingent on the completion of an interest survey and the COVID-19 guidelines come May.

UConn women’s soccer recap: UConn falls 2-1 to receive their first loss of the season

The UConn women’s soccer team fell to the Providence Friars 2-1 at Anderson Stadium on Thursday, March 4.

Residential Assistants upset over updated employment end date and potential reduced stipend

The University of Connecticut Residential Life informed its residential assistants and senior resident assistants on Feb. 22 of an updated employment end date that would lead to a stipend reduction for those who choose to leave early. ResLife emailed the residential assistants and senior residential assistants to say their employment end date per their contract ends Monday, May 10. However, for RAs or SRAs who want to change their employment end date to Monday, April 12 – the start of spring break – they may do so at the expense of having their semesterly stipend reduced.

Prison systems and COVID-19: What’s the connection?

Cook County Jail in Chicago, one of the largest prisons in the country, became widely known and reported on during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the high number of positive COVID-19 cases among inmates. During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, The New York Times reported that Cook County Jail was the nation’s largest known source of COVID-19 infection. This sparked protest and social unrest over the failures of the jail to protect and prioritize the health and safety of their inmates.

What's new

Biden says US on track to produce vaccines for all adults by end of May, Texas to reopen 

President Biden announced on Tuesday the U.S. is on track to provide vaccination for all adults in the country by the end of May. This announcement was a consequence of the newly Food and Drug Administration approved Johnson and Johnson vaccine, which only requires one shot, rather than two, as well as a manufacturing deal with the drugmaker Merck. 

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Comics

This Week in Photos

This Week in Photos: Feb 7-14

There's a lot to love about the UConn campus around Valentine's Day this year.

Hot Topics

COVID-19

Two Truths and a Lie: COVID-19, vaccination and fake news

I was watching YouTube videos during a homework break when I saw a video of a few extremist YouTubers I was familiar with discussing COVID-19 vaccines. This should be good, I thought, planning to watch their protests as a source of entertainment. As a future scientist, I pride myself on my dedication to facts and proceeded to mentally debunk their claims… until they mentioned the vaccines’ “potential link” to infertility.

Prison systems and COVID-19: What’s the connection?

Cook County Jail in Chicago, one of the largest prisons in the country, became widely known and reported on during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the high number of positive COVID-19 cases among inmates. During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, The New York Times reported that Cook County Jail was the nation’s largest known source of COVID-19 infection. This sparked protest and social unrest over the failures of the jail to protect and prioritize the health and safety of their inmates.

Connecticut’s changed vaccine plan optimizes efficiency, forgets vulnerable populations

On the Feb. 23, Gov. Ned Lamont announced a massive change to the way our state handles eligibility for the Coronavirus vaccine. Before the 23rd, eligibility was determined based on occupation and other risk factors like pre-existing conditions and age. But in a press conference that surprised the vaccine advisory board, Lamont announced that he believed the CDC’s guidelines to be too expansive and therefore decided an age-based approach would be easier to execute.

New CT vaccine rollout plan receives mixed responses from UConn community

On Feb. 22, Governor Ned Lamont announced the new plan for a vaccine rollout in Connecticut, which began on March 1. This received mixed responses from UConn students, especially from those who will now have to wait longer than anticipated for the COVID-19 vaccine.

BLACK LIVES MATTER

Racial Microaggressions Study finds flaws in the racial climate at UConn

Researchers studying racial microaggressions at the University of Connecticut report that 43% of students who completed a survey feel they need to minimize aspects of their racial and ethnic background to fit in at UConn.

AACC begins Black History Month with the co-founder of Black Lives Matter

The University of Connecticut H. Fred Simons African American Cultural Center held their annual Black History Month opening ceremony yesterday evening featuring guest speaker Patrisse Cullors. Cullors is an artist and activist who co-founded the Black Lives Matter Global Network.

Spirit Rock ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural vandalized

The University of Connecticut Police Department arrested two individuals last week after they admitted to vandalizing and partially spray painting over the “Black Lives Matter” Spirit Rock mural on Hillside Road of the university’s main campus in Storrs, according to a press release.

Black Lives Matter and Asian solidarity

The Asian and Asian American Studies Institute partnered with the Nazrul Fund for Decolonial Art in a virtual discussion with scholars titled, “Black Lives Matter and Asian Pacific Decolonization” from 12 to 2 p.m. yesterday afternoon.

ELECTION 2020

UConn students seek to FLIP conversation in their local government

Noah Frank, a sixth-semester political science and economics double major, said that through his work with local politics, he noticed a lack of representation of younger professionals and leaders in the community. This led to him becoming one of the founding members of South Windsor Future Leaders in Politics, or FLIP. The group aims to recruit young professionals, students and leaders from the South Windsor community. Frank describes FLIP as a movement that hopes to bring the issues of students and families to the forefront.

It’s time to talk about Hartford’s asymmetrical relationship with Stamford and Fairfield County

A few months ago, I asked a friend how she would be voting in the 2020 election. She said she would be voting for Democrats because that’s who Latinx folks are supposed to vote for. As a long-time Democratic supporter, I should have felt content with her choice -- but instead, I felt deeply concerned.

Celebrations in a Pandemic

On the morning of Saturday, Nov. 7, four days after the 2020 election, most major media outlets named Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. Following an incredibly stressful four days as Biden slowly made progress in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin as mail-in ballots were counted, the election was finally over.

While Trump campaign continues ballot validity battle, Biden transition team lays groundwork for upcoming administration

After the declaration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. as the 46th President of the United States on Saturday, the Trump campaign still has yet to concede as they file lawsuits in multiple battleground states. President Trump is currently working on new lawsuits to sue multiple states over various elements of the voting process and is asking for recounts.