Students On The Stand: Impeachment Trial for USG comptroller

USG’s Dylan Nenadal impeachment trial was held Monday night in UConn’s Student Union.  Photo by Nicole Jain, Grab Photographer/The Daily Campus.

USG’s Dylan Nenadal impeachment trial was held Monday night in UConn’s Student Union. Photo by Nicole Jain, Grab Photographer/The Daily Campus.

Tensions ran high in the University of Connecticut Student Union Monday night at an impeachment trial for Undergraduate Student Government (USG) comptroller Dylan Nenadal. 

Nenadal was accused of being partial to funding “The Homies,” an advocacy group for Homer Babbidge Library that he helped found, trial witness and fifth-semester communication and psychology double major Griffin Love said. Earlier in the semester, Nenadal reached out to Love and fellow member of The Homies, fifth-semester biomedical engineering major Austin Mott, to discuss gaining school funding for the club. 

Impeachment charges were brought against Nenadal by Operations and Risk Manager Grace Brangwynne.  

A verdict had not been announced at the time of publication. 

Chief Justice Nicole Gagnon’s first executive order was to immediately make the meeting private. 

“I am entering to move this discussion into executive discussion,” Chief Justice Gagnon said. “Thank you for your time.” 

 Love said the meeting consisted of Nenadal telling The Homies how to get funding. 

“He is no longer a member,” Love said. “The meeting was just informational.” 

 The Homies did not request any funds after their discussion with Nenadal.  

 “We haven’t had any funding in the past. We never knew we could even get funding,” Mott said. “[Nenadal] just walked us through the website.” 

Upon their departure, Love and Mott were confident in Nenadal’s innocence.  

“From what we’ve heard [in the trial] no, [he won’t be impeached],” Love said. “All we heard was The Homies-related stuff, which we think we cleared up in there.”  

Third witness Josh Wojtyna declined to comment. 

After testifying, plaintiff Grace Brangwynne said the final decision was “indeterminate” but that Nenadal will be brought up on charges of unethical behavior.  

“Comptroller Nanadal clarified a lot of the exhibits that were entered, but I still believe he was guilty of unethical behavior,” Brangwynne said. “There is still a lot to be said in this case.” 

 


Grace Burns is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at grace.burns@uconn.edu