The Veterans History Project: Recounting stories of valor and sacrifice

0
1
exc-5c7c7a957817f77ad943f4f9

This internship, dubbed the Veterans History Project, will kick off Monday, March 4, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Werth Tower Room 112. (File/The Daily Campus)

The University of Connecticut Office of Veterans Affairs and Military Programs is providing an opportunity for UConn students and faculty to take part in an internship to conduct and archive interviews at the U.S. Library of Congress in an effort to preserve the memories, experiences and sacrifices of service members from World War II to the present.

This internship, dubbed the Veterans History Project, will kick off Monday, March 4, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Werth Tower Room 112.

The program was brought to UConn by the Office of Veterans Affairs and Military Programs in collaboration with the UConn Department of History. It is part of a nationwide effort created by the U.S. Congress in 2000 as a way to commemorate and record the distinguished service of countless men and women who have answered the nation’s call of duty.

The Veterans History Project consists of developing professional oral interviewing skills and cataloging accounts for archiving in order to “[collect, preserve and make] accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war,” according to the Office of Veterans Affairs and Military Programs website.

The internship flyer explains that students can receive one to four credits or apply for work study for the internship. Research grants are also available through the Office of Undergraduate Research. Students of all majors are welcome to participate, and no prior experience is necessary.

For George J. Penney III, a second-semester journalism major and the social media manager for the Office of Veterans Affairs who previously served in the U.S. Navy as a mass communication specialist, this project is a stark reminder of how important it is to honor the legacy of those who have served.

“As a veteran, I know there are a countless number of stories to be told from our veteran community,” Penney said. “The Veterans History Project is the perfect way to capture those stories and make sure they stand the test of time within the confines of the Library of Congress. This will be an incredible opportunity for UConn students and faculty to literally be a part of capturing history and preserving it for generations to come.”


Derek Pan is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at derek.pan@uconn.edu.

Leave a Reply