Will flying cars be a boon or bane for our society?

0
30


It is predicted that flying vehicles will be introduced to the world sometime in the near future. These flying vehicles, particularly the flying taxi, will allow passengers to have a ride where they can be passengers and enjoy the scenery around them. (graphic by Carly Zaleski/The Daily Campus)

It is predicted that flying vehicles will be introduced to the world sometime in the near future. These flying vehicles, particularly the flying taxi, will allow passengers to have a ride where they can be passengers and enjoy the scenery around them. (graphic by Carly Zaleski/The Daily Campus)

Our world is full of innovations. New technology is developed in the blink of an eye. Have you ever imagined what it would be like to ride in a flying vehicle? It is predicted that flying vehicles will be introduced to the world sometime in the near future. These flying vehicles, particularly the flying taxi, will allow passengers to have a ride where they can be passengers and enjoy the scenery around them. However, the projected invention will not be an automatic driving taxi; rather, a driver-pilot will control it. As there is a need for pilots, when the new invention is introduced there may arise a scarcity of pilots if flying taxis will prove to be in demand.

There are several flying car prototypes that have already been made. In particular, the prototype Bell Nexus was revealed earlier this year, and Boeing and Airbus have prototypes made as well. The goal for these flying cars is to reduce transportation congestion on the ground. In many cases, flying cars could save time because you would not need to pass through heavily congested roads or highways. Also, you can avoid roads that are not properly maintained. We are all aware of when our vehicles skid or shake as they go over potholes or bumps in the road, but with flying vehicles, potholes and bumps won’t be a concern. Furthermore, flying vehicles bring aesthetic value. You can also essentially show off your car for everyone to see.

However, with this arises some disadvantages. First and foremost, one will need a pilot license as the vehicles are operated in the air, so this limits the projected buyer market. As these new vehicles are invented to make life easier in the sense that they save time, there comes an increase in price. Such new technologies will be estimated to have higher prices than cars now. There can be higher prices even after buying the vehicles: For example, think about how many inspections a flying vehicle will have to undergo. As this new technology will be one of the first flying vehicles, there arises an issue of trust. Can we rely on it to properly function? Will it be able to last a long time,while providing us with the efficient transportation that we need? One can only imagine number of the routine inspections that these vehicles will have to go through; not only because they will just be introduced to the market, but also to ensure the safety of the driver and passengers as well. Due to this, we can only expect the maintenance cost of the flying technologies to be greater than that of our current vehicles. Additionally, do we expect flying vehicles to work in all conditions? They may not be suited for certain weather conditions, which limits the ability for flying vehicles to work in all types of situations.

One of the major problems with introducing flying vehicles is how dystopian our society will become. Certainly, as society introduces new technologies, more and more people will be willing to try them as they slowly get introduced to the market. However, think about those who are less fortunate who cannot afford such technologies? According to NPR News, “with money flying around, you know, looking down at the poor homeless, who have no options in that regard”. This statement does add authenticity to it as not everyone can afford such technologies.

In conclusion, flying cars have both advantages and disadvantages, forcing us to make the conclusion that they can function as both a boon and a bane. The real question that we have to ask is how productive such technologies will be and its long-lasting impact on ourselves, the environment, and future society.


Leave a Reply