UConn student groups host clean-ups for earth day

0
8

The alternative break took place partially during the government shutdown. This caused the group to lose some time at The Everglades National Park. Other national parks were able to remain open thanks to additional funds they had from local groups and State funds. (Julie Spillane/The Daily Campus)

As a way to commemorate Earth Day, UConn’s Environmental Conservation Alternative Break and the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Graduate Student Association have organized campus clean-up events.  

The alternative break group will be gathering from 2:30-5:30 p.m. on the Great Lawn with supplies provided. The EEB Graduate Student Association will be meeting in the BioPhysics Lobby at 8 a.m. for refreshments and supplies and then will move to X lot.  

Both events encourage people to stop by and help for any amount of time they have available. 

Deanne Edwards, an eighth-semester environmental science major, is organizing the Environmental Conservation Alternative Break event. She emphasized the importance of individual action in helping the environment.

“It is necessary for us to be aware of the little things everyone can do to be more environmentally friendly,” Edwards said. “Some easy changes everyone can do in their daily lives include recycling, conserving electricity and water, and making sure not to litter, and picking it up when you do see it.” 

This spring a group of students travelled to Biscayne and the Everglades National Park as part of one of UConn’s alternative breaks. Edwards was one of the participants of the trip. 

“We picked up over 1,600 pounds of trash washed up on a beach in Biscayne where baby sea turtles will lay their eggs,” Edwards said. “We also visited a Fruit and Spice Park where we spent the day removing invasive species. We could tell that the work we did was really inspiring and impactful.” 

The alternative break took place partially during the government shutdown. This caused the group to lose some time at The Everglades National Park. Other national parks were able to remain open thanks to additional funds they had from local groups and State funds. 

“Not all the problems happen on an individual level, but I truly do believe that education and spreading the word is what everyone can do to better the planet on a small and local level,” Edwards said. 


Alyssa Pagan is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached at alyssa.pagan_hagearty@uconn.edu.

Leave a Reply