Research study: Imaging researchers study the human brain 

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A new study at UConn seeks to understand different influences in the cognitive development of children.  Photo by    Robina Weermeijer    on    Unsplash

A new study at UConn seeks to understand different influences in the cognitive development of children. Photo by Robina Weermeijer on Unsplash

The Brain Imaging Center at the University of Connecticut is currently conducting research regarding a family brain study.  

 The study is called Intergenerational Neuroimaging of Language and Reading Networks, Dennis Wu, the research coordinator at the Brain Imaging Center, said.  

 Wu said they are interested in various cognitive components of the mind.  

“We are interested in disentangling genetic and environmental components that influence cognitive abilities including reading, math and language skills,” Wu said. “Prenatal influences as well as postnatal are very important as it affects the development of brain functions.” 

 Wu said they are using various skills to look into the research topic. 

 “We use neuroimaging techniques and neuropsychological assessments to investigate this specific topic,” Wu said. “Neuroimaging will allow us to see how a child’s brain is similar or different from their parents and the assessments will compare how well they perform on certain tasks.” 

 This is a five year, multi-site study in collaboration with the University of California which aims to understand the brain in-depth, according to Wu.  

 “We hope that through this study we are able to understand more of the influences that affects the development of the brain, more specifically reading and language trajectories,” Wu said.   

 Families with children between the ages of five and 12 are invited to participate in the research program, according to Wu.  

For more information about the study, students can contact Wu or visit the Brain Imaging Research Center website.


 Anthony Zepperi is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at anthony.zepperi@uconn.edu.

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