National news from the decade

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Barack Obama signs the Patient Care and Affordable Care Act at the White House.  Photo in the    public domain

Barack Obama signs the Patient Care and Affordable Care Act at the White House. Photo in the public domain

This decade, the world has seen great tragedy and triumph. 

To look back at all that has happened this decade, let’s run through some of the biggest national and international stories from each year. 

2010:  

As they do every year, Jenny McCarthy, Ryan Seacrest and the late Dick Clark rang in 2010 with a ball drop on ABC.  

A few months later, one of the most influential developments of the decade occurred as the Affordable Care Act was signed into law on March 23, 2010. The ACA, or Obamacare as it became known, gave millions of Americans access to healthcare they otherwise wouldn’t have. Due in part to the individual mandate, many, but not all, people would have to pay a tax if they did not have health insurance, whether it be public or private. 

2011: 

Just a week into the year, tragedy struck the nation as a gunman opened fire on a Safeway grocery store in Arizona, killing six and injuring 24. Among those injured were Congresswoman Gabby Giffords Ari-D, a noted gun control advocate, and John Roll, a federal judge. 

Everyone who was old enough remembers where they were when the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 happened. Nearly 10 years later, terrorist organization Al Qaeda’s leader Osama bin Laden hit the news once again when he was announced dead on May 2, 2011 following a US military raid of his compound in Pakistan. 

2012: 

After over a year of campaigning and debates, President Barack Obama won re-election on Nov. 6, securing 322 electoral college votes to Republican nominee Mitt Romney’s 206. Obama won key races in Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania en route to a return to the Oval Office.  

A little more than a month later, on Dec. 14, 2012, a gunman walked into Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. and killed 26 people and injured two. He then killed himself, and it was later found that he had killed his mother as well, putting the death toll at 28. It was the second-deadliest school shooting at the time and remains the fourth deadliest now.   


Tragedy struck again as five people were killed from two bombs set off near the finish line at the 117th annual Boston Marathon.  Photo in the    public domain

Tragedy struck again as five people were killed from two bombs set off near the finish line at the 117th annual Boston Marathon. Photo in the public domain

2013: 

At the 117th annual Boston Marathon, tragedy struck again as five people were killed from two bombs set off near the finish line. Several hundreds of people were injured. A manhunt ensued to catch the two suspects, one of whom was killed and another of whom was sentenced to death. 

2014: 

In 2014, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and subsequent mini-outbreaks around the globe, received vast coverage. Ebola, which is still around today, killed 11,000 people between 2014 to 2016, and 28,000 people were infected in total, according to the World Health Organization. 

Also hitting news cycles in 2014 was the highly mysterious disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 on March 8. The plane, which was on its way to Beijing, China, disappeared 38 minutes into the flight and crashed somewhere in the Indian Ocean, according to confirmed pieces of the aircraft that washed ashore in the following years. The crash presumedly killed all 239 people aboard the flight. 


The Supreme Court ruling in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges   declared same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states on June 26, 2015.  Photo in the    public domain

The Supreme Court ruling in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges declared same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states on June 26, 2015. Photo in the public domain

2015: 

The Supreme Court ruling in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges declared same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states on June 26, 2015. The ruling lifted all bans on same-sex marriage throughout the country and forced all states to honor out-of-state marriage licenses for same-sex couples.  

2016: 

The United Kingdom held a referendum on June 23 on whether the country should stay in the European Union or not. Fifty-two percent of people voted leave, thrusting the country into a still-ongoing Brexit process. As a result, then Prime Minister David Cameron announced he would resign that October. 

Another world power had a regime change five months later, as Republican President Donald Trump won the U.S. general election over Democrat Hillary Clinton. He accumulated 304 electoral college votes to Clinton’s 227, winning battleground races in Florida, Michigan, Penn. and Ohio.  

2017: 

Originally founded in 2006 by Tarana Burke, the #MeToo movement hit the forefront of the news when dozens of sexual harassment and assault allegations against Hollywood director Harvey Weinstein were reported in October. After allegations against Weinstein went public, more people came forward with their long-held stories of sexual violence they had experienced. The movement’s goal is to empower women through shared experience. 

In October, a shooter killed 59 people and injured hundreds from his Mandalay Bay Hotel room in Las Vegas. He shot over 1,100 rounds and used 24 different guns in the deadliest mass shooting in American history. 

2018: 

Massive gun violence protests occurred in 2018 as a result of the uptick in mass shootings, specifically led by the students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas in Parkland, Florida. The students responded to an attack on their high school with the March for Our Lives protests, organizing student-led walk outs and rallies throughout the country. 


Over 1,000 different protests happened in the U.S., including Fridays for Future student protests, where students skipped school and rallied over growing fears of climate change.  Photo in the    public domain

Over 1,000 different protests happened in the U.S., including Fridays for Future student protests, where students skipped school and rallied over growing fears of climate change. Photo in the public domain

2019: 

In September, Greta Thunberg and a group of organizations across the globe mobilized millions of people to protest governments over growing fears of climate change. Over 1,000 different protests happened in the U.S., including Fridays for Future student protests, where students skipped school and rallied around this issue. 

Also in September, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi voiced her support for an impeachment proceeding into Trump stemming from a phone call between the president and President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine in July. A release transcript of the phone call revealed Trump spoke with Zelensky of a potential investigation into Hunter Biden, son of Democratic primary candidate Joe Biden, Trump’s potential opponent in the 2020 general election. 


Mike Mavredakis is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at michael.quinn-mavredakis@uconn.edu. He tweets @mmavredakis

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