The Academic Achievement Center and Center for Career Development are both offering workshops and career fairs for students this semester, in hopes to help those in search of careers

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The college and career center located in Wilbur Cross offers information on how to apply for internships. This is a great resource for students looking to jumpstart their careers.  Photo by Erin Knapp/The Daily Campus

The college and career center located in Wilbur Cross offers information on how to apply for internships. This is a great resource for students looking to jumpstart their careers. Photo by Erin Knapp/The Daily Campus

One of the main ways the Academic Achievement Center assists students is through UConn Connects, the largest volunteer mentoring service offered by the university, designed to provide students with skills and support for academic success. They do this through small group and one-on-one sessions that focus on communicating effectively.  

The Center also gives students the opportunity to lead a session reviewing material as it relates to their major. This supplemental instruction involves academic coaching and content that Director of Academic Support Leo Lachut said is an amazing experience for students.  

“All majors can benefit from academic coaching, workshops, presentations and public speaking skills,” Lachut said.  

Drop-ins are another key component of the Center. These sessions consist of strategizing with students in a one-on-one session, quickly assisting them with developing academic skills specifically tailored to them.  

More than 20 workshops are available for students throughout the year, with niche subjects that can appeal to a wide variety of groups that include “Email organization,” “Online course support,” and “Prioritization techniques.”   

The Center for Career Development is another on-campus resource that provides students with necessary information and events as it relates to employment.  

The center offers a wide variety of career and internship fairs that allows one to network with various employers, with one of the most renowned being the “Storrs Spring Career Fair” that occurs in March.  

 Ethan Beattie, a sixth-semester engineering student, emphasized how beneficial career fairs can be. 

“As a sophomore after one career fair, I got seven interviews and was offered three summer internships over many upperclassmen who were more qualified than I was,” Beattie said.  

Along with these fairs are a variety of websites that help students attain employment and research companies as it relates to their career, such as “Vault: Research Employers,” “Handshake” and “Mergent Intellect.” 

Career-related plans can be discussed with career coaches provided at the Center that not only assist students in prioritizing goals, but also help them build stronger resumes and give advice on how to prepare for interviews.  

Caitlin Jenkins, a sophomore engineering major, further asserted how beneficial these coaches can be. 

“Erin Peterson, the career consultant at the School of Engineering, helped me search for internships, looked at my resume, and gave me good general tips,” Jenkins said.  

 Career Communities also assist students in narrowing down their career aspirations in relevant fields. Students can interact with faculty and staff by writing blogs, participating as mentors and helping their fellow peers decide which community falls within their interests.   

More information as it relates to the Academic Achievement Center can be found at beamentor.uconn.edu and achieve.uconn.edu. For the Center for Career Development, information can be found at career.uconn.edu. 


Sebastian Garay-Ortega is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached at sebastian.garay-ortega@uconn.edu. He tweets @sebastian__305.

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