League of Legends Rundown

0
0
exc-5e44b750862eea0e6b72e701


A group of people takes part in a video game competition. This week features an exciting collection of league action.  Photo courtesy of Anthony Brolin via Unspalsh

A group of people takes part in a video game competition. This week features an exciting collection of league action. Photo courtesy of Anthony Brolin via Unspalsh

LCK begins  

Korea’s League of Legends spring split has begun. Afreeca Freecs, DragonX and Geng have taken an early 2-0 lead, which is somewhat unsurprising given that Afreeca won the Kespa Cup back at the end of 2019. DragonX’s position at 2-0 is somewhat more surprising; the team made several risky decisions in the off-season, like its decision to have its starting support be 17-year-old Keria and signing coach CVMax, who has faced allegations of verbal and physical harassment of his players. Perhaps more interestingly, last year’s No. 1 seed T1, formerly SK Telecom T1, found themselves 1-1 after the first week, beating Damwon Gaming but losing a close match to Hanwha Life Esports.  

Cloud9 takes full control of LCS 

Through the first third of the season, Cloud9 has looked untouchable. They’re 6-0, and most of their games haven’t even seemed close. And while there is an asterisk next to their win versus Team Liquid, who was missing their jungler Broxah, they’ve beaten five out of the six teams below them dominantly. Cloud9’s jungler Blaber, in his first season as a full-time starting player, has paired startlingly well with midlaner Nisqy. Licorce’s constancy in the top lane and the revamped botlane of Zven and Vulcan has led to one of the best early splits Cloud9 has ever had. The question is if they can keep that up as the season continues.  

Broxah is coming!  

After four split wins in a row, expectations coming into the split were incredibly high for Team Liquid. Most of their roster stayed the same with one exception: Broxah. Fnatic’s former jungler and a former Worlds finalist also happens to be the reason for the asterisk next to their 2-4 start. Visa problems have delayed his arrival in North America, and he only managed to procure his visa just before the Week 3 games. While his arrival will be welcome, it won’t come without a thread of concern creeping in for fans, because what happens if Liquid still loses? Liquid has not looked impressive thus far, losing a bloody game to bottom-tier Golden Guardians last week, and only so much of that can be blamed on substitute jungler Shernfire. If Broxah’s arrival doesn’t mark a turnaround for Team Liquid, they may suffer one of the most shockingly poor splits in history. Also, they really need to stop picking Senna; they’ve lost all four games with Senna this split, and it’s looked incredibly bad.  

G2 beats down their opposition, but questions remain  

G2 Esports has rushed to a 6-0 start in the LEC, closing out Week 3 with a dominant victory over Fnatic. One-third of the way through the split, the first-place team has once again established themselves as the team to beat, but this time, it’s not without difficulty. Their game against Rogue, who has not looked fantastic so far in spring, was much closer than it should’ve been, and while Caps has been decent, he’s yet to completely pop off in a way that makes us think G2 can win Worlds. Despite this, G2 is still without question the favorite to win LEC. Their game against Misfits, the current second-place team, this week will be a good test. If they win, their path to another title seems to be pretty clear, but if they lose, Misfits might have a strong case for first.


Ashton Stansel is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at ashton.stansel@uconn.edu.

Leave a Reply